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Rebuild Of My Sony Sxrd Ks70R200A Optical Block

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I wonder whether there are any 70" SXRD rear pro TVs in good working order in Australia, getting little use, and gathering dust. No challenge of course, as no need to repair.

Freight not cheap, but otherwise could be a good proposition for an SXRD-phile like Pixels.

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Is he a 'phile', or just some lunatic who has completely lost it!! :hyper::yes:

No, my job entails fault finding on industrial electronics [offset press, bindery etc.] and failure is simply not an option. I'm always having to find another 'rabbit in the hat' to drag some malfunctioning machine out of the fire.

Won't be long before I'm the malfunctioning machine :twitch:

Edited by Pixels
fix emoticons

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When the going gets tough the tough get going.

Its dedication and perseverance like yours that is responsible for the advances of man kind.

As a fellow electrical, electronic and mechanical fault finding professional I understand the mind set, failure is not an option. On ya mate.

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Owen, glad to know there's someone on this forum that understands the dilemma!

I've been tied up lately with nightmares on current technology to a machine that was built in the 70's that uses a computer based on the intel 8080 architecture!!

But back on topic, it's "whoo-hoo" time, my sxrd is back together delivering a pic that has that wow factor back again!

The below screen shot of my favorite "very scary robot" aka Cameron Phillips, was taken with my very old and 'been through the washing machine' Nokia 6720 mobile ph, so the color is not totally accurate and the resolution is down quite a bit.

Actually, I'm not sure which one I'm most impressed with, the pic on the sxrd or the unretouched pic of the pic from the Nokia! :)

sxrd1.jpg

Anyways, I've got a lot more to report on plus episode 2 of the sxrd nightmare rabbit warren.

I've also done a couple of mods to the set.

Need some shut-eye after spending the day re-claiming my lounge room back again!

Back soon

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Finally found time for another update.

Another red panel in the green position did not fix my uneven green problem, but I did manage to find a balance where in most scenes it's hard to spot that there is a problem.

Green is hot around the middle of the screen for some reason, must be something to do with the filters.

One mod I did was to black out the plastic that houses the OB and behind the screen with flat black lacquer to cut down on stray light [spray with plastic primer first]

Doing this to the OB housing definitely helped a bit, behind the screen - maybe a bit - probably not worth the effort, though it was worth the effort to pull the screen off anyway, as my mirror had a hazy coating of crud on it.

This got me back the last few percent of peak white I felt I was still missing.

blackout1.jpg

blackout2.jpg

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Behind the screen - masked up before spraying

blackout3.jpg

After spraying

blackout4.jpg

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Another mod was to improve the heat exchange for the lamp air by adding fins to it.
Before the mod, the heat exchanger was red hot from top to bottom - hardly any temp difference. After the mod it was only hot at the top, dropping to still fairly warm but much cooler at the bottom.

What I've done here is a bit rough n ready, the discs are cut from 1mm thick ali. using a 55mm hole saw, then punched with a 35mm chassis punch using a small bench press I have. 1mm ali. doesn't put up much of a fight!
Many more rings of say 0.5mm copper could yield even better results, but one might have to be careful not to run the lamp too cool. Arc lamps can run into problems if prevented from reaching their operating temp.

What I was looking to do was to increase the lamp cooling to allow me to run the fans at the much quieter low setting and keep the lamp around the same temp as on the high setting.

The tube is the original heat exchanger [has finning on the inside]

heat1.jpg

heat2.jpg

Another update coming soon! :)

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The nightmare - episode 2.

I blew this set up 3 times during the course of this panel swap and managed to drag it out of the fire on all 3 occasions.

Blow-up No. 1

I had just finished an adjustment, put the set together to test, switched on and had a red code flashing for lamp.

Switched off, had a look at the plugs on the ballast - left the ballast power feed plug off. Waited 'till the set had finished it's cool-down cycle then proceeded to put the plug in place.

As I pushed the plug onto the pins, there was a 'tick' sound and a tiny blue flash of capacitor discharge from the main power board into the ballast - I grimaced - cursing myself for not waiting longer before connecting the plug.

Capacitor discharges causing inrush currents are never a good thing.

Sure enough, when I switched back on the red code for lamp had been replaced by the red code for ballast - now I was seriously kicking myself - livid!!

I got on the net, searched high and low in every corner I could think of, but could not find this ballast anywhere on the planet - the kerb side just got a lot closer for this set.

Then I suddenly realized 'wait...there's one roll of the dice I haven't tried yet....search by part number'

Dived into the service manual, found the part number and searched it on ebay - one hit came up - in the US - good working used - couldn't click 'Buy now' fast enough - I was saved!

Turns out the XBR2 sets in the US used exactly the same ballast as our Au sets and the seller just happened to list it by part number. If he hadn't done that, I would have never found it.

So, sitting....waiting.....waiting, eventually it arrived - looked good, nothing broken - plugged it up, switched on and to my horror, still had red code for ballast....nooooo!!!!

So, what now...is the 'good' ballast not so good....or is the fault somewhere else?

Traced the wires back to the main [G] power board, found the wires in the service manual circuit and immediately had a 'ah-ha' moment - 'fusible resistors! I bet that's it!!'

Checked with a meter and sure enough, one of them was open circuit. They're 2.7 ohm fusible resistors, one in each leg.

Not having any, I just bridged across the blown one with a normal 5w 2.7 ohm resistor.

Plugged everything back up and the set was working again! whew!! We live again. Tried my original ballast and it was fine, so now I have a spare ballast :)

Blow-up No. 2

As in the first disaster, I had just done an adjustment, plugged up the set and when I switched on I heard one fan spinning up to speed too soon.

I'd had this happen before and knew exactly which plug I had left out. Switched off, waited for cool down and for the set to power off, pulled a few bits out the way so I could get to the plug.

Again, as I pushed to two halves together, there was a 'tick' sound.....'goddammit, not again...when will you learn!!' facepalm.jpg

Sure enough, when I switched on [service mode startup], all I got was ever increasing brightness causing me to hastily switch off, fearing a melt down of the OB! - the kerb side was now really, really close - 'your not getting out of jail this time'

The wires in question send power to the optical panel driver board that sits on top of the OB.

Back into the service manual circuits, traced out where the wires were going and noticed fusible links in series with a couple of them.

But when I checked the pcb, it was not wired quite the same as the circuit diag. There were fusible links on the pcb in the right area, but they were ok, but I did notice the copper trace going to another really tiny smd.

After some head scratching and continuity testing, I was certain that this device was a fusible link and under strong magnification it did have what looked like a tiny crater hole on its surface.

I carefully bridged it out with a single strand of fine copper wire and viola, the set was working again - got out of jail a second time!!

Blow-up No. 3

Not an electrical disaster like the first two, but a mechanical disaster.

I was plugging the set up when my eyes caught a slivery glint from the cable I was about to plug in. It was the ribbon cable that runs from the OB and loops around under the main chassis and plugs into the back of it.

I had unplugged and replugged this cable sooo many times, that a few of the traces had started to lift off from the end of the cable! [kerb side jumps for joy - it was sure the set was all it's this time!!]

Look after this cable - you will not find another - I certainly couldn't find anything like it - XBR2's are different in this area, as are all others.

But having come this far, having jumped so many hurdles, I couldn't give up now without a fight.

I carefully examined the cable and figured, if I can get the plug shell of the end, I could trim the last couple of mm off the end of the cable to get rid of the damaged part, carefully surface trim the plastic off the end to expose fresh traces, reassemble the shell back on the end and we should be good to go.

I did all of this and won the day. Trimming the plastic without trimming the traces was tricky - almost mucked it up by accidentally removing a couple of uM of trace with plastic on one trim.

Re-assembled with the cable reversed [it is symmetrical] with the repaired end in the OB pcb where it would never have to be disturbed again - and I was out of jail - again!!

I swear to god.......

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Pixels, I imagine your life could seem to be missing something, now that the SXRD restoration is finally complete.

Have you lined up a new form of self-torture to indulge in? Or are you inclined to rest on your laurels? ;-)

Edited by MLXXX

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What a saga :no: Kind of glad I never bought one of those now. I was lucky The Good Guys sold the 70" they had not before I looked at it dozens of times but to be honest it never looked that hot in the showroom and I had a 50" NEC plasma monitor with STB which was quite well regarded way back then.

You deserve a medal for your perseverance

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Pixel,

You are an inspiration.

I picked up a second hand 60" SXRD to use to repair/replace my sun burnt panel. I just haven't been game to open the optical block and play yet. Now that I can start to understand the amount of work required and I am also starting the to feel the urge to repair. I need something to do over the Christmas break.

I do have a couple of questions that may or may not help others thinking of replacing their damaged panels.

You talked about getting the height of the panel correct for focus. Would using something like feeler gauges to measure the height of the old panel before removal been possible? (this would assume that the panels in their housing sit at the same height) Also are the panels fixed at one end and that tab that sticks out allows for pivot twisting? Would making the exact position of the old panel before moving have helped getting the alignment in easier?

Also did you ever replace the UV filter?

With the ebay panels did you ever get one working correctly? You seem to have dropped off commenting on these? Are they not worth purchasing due to the poor black levels or was this caused by something else?

And to anyone out there that would like to have their OB panel replaced. I am keen to use my second set as a test rig to see if this will help setting the panel up easier.

I love my SXRD TV and would have purchased a newer version if they existed. I am now keen on looking at a 4K SXRD projector just price is the limiting factor here.

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I've just watched the following youtube video. The guy seems to be a professional technician. A very slick presentation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oP2nNPOjn_Y

I see he rigged up an arrangement for projecting onto the ceiling. I think that is the only way I could contemplate undertaking this to completion, but even so it would be a real pain. Perhaps if someone else wants to do this with a compatible SXRD (mine is the 60" Australian set) I could provide a Red or Green subpanel, i.e. I could disassemble mine and fish out the good subpanels. [better still, I could supply the whole set intact and leave the disassembly to someone keen.]

And to anyone out there that would like to have their OB panel replaced. I am keen to use my second set as a test rig to see if this will help setting the panel up easier.

AnthonyP69, r u contemplating offering an OB panel replacement service? I'm not sure how keen I'd be, but I am in Brisbane if that makes a difference.

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Pixels, I imagine your life could seem to be be missing something, now that the SXRD restoration is finally complete.

Have you lined up a new form of self-torture to indulge in? Or are you inclined to rest on your laurels? ;-)

Hahaha, I think you meant 'self-destruction'! :D No, no time for rest here, there are a couple of cars I have that await restoration, a couple of valve radios that need a tweak, a Playmaster valve amp that needs it's output transformers re-wound....oh god, life's too short!!

But I am happily bathing in the warm glow of sxrd heaven when I do sit in front of it. :)

What a saga :no: Kind of glad I never bought one of those now. I was lucky The Good Guys sold the 70" they had not before I looked at it dozens of times but to be honest it never looked that hot in the showroom and I had a 50" NEC plasma monitor with STB which was quite well regarded way back then.

You deserve a medal for your perseverance

What a saga indeed :lol:

This begs the question - was it worth it - you bet!!

Whilst sxrd is not without it's minuses, when adjusted properly and driven with good, high bandwidth source e.g. bluray, the pq is simply stunning!

There have been times of late, where for a fleeting moment, the brain [what's left of it! :) ] has done a back-flip because it has been sucked into believing that it's actually there at the scene, not just watching a picture of the scene.

Would I do it all again - you bet - and in a fraction of the time!

Pixel,

You are an inspiration.

I picked up a second hand 60" SXRD to use to repair/replace my sun burnt panel. I just haven't been game to open the optical block and play yet. Now that I can start to understand the amount of work required and I am also starting the to feel the urge to repair. I need something to do over the Christmas break.

I do have a couple of questions that may or may not help others thinking of replacing their damaged panels.

You talked about getting the height of the panel correct for focus. Would using something like feeler gauges to measure the height of the old panel before removal been possible? (this would assume that the panels in their housing sit at the same height) Also are the panels fixed at one end and that tab that sticks out allows for pivot twisting? Would making the exact position of the old panel before moving have helped getting the alignment in easier?

Also did you ever replace the UV filter?

With the ebay panels did you ever get one working correctly? You seem to have dropped off commenting on these? Are they not worth purchasing due to the poor black levels or was this caused by something else?

And to anyone out there that would like to have their OB panel replaced. I am keen to use my second set as a test rig to see if this will help setting the panel up easier.

I love my SXRD TV and would have purchased a newer version if they existed. I am now keen on looking at a 4K SXRD projector just price is the limiting factor here.

Hi Anthony, I will be posting up many more pics of the operation, but here's a few pointers.

The panels are mounted with a screw on each corner which fix it to 'ears' that are sitting up from the main mounting frame.

So with the panel removed you can get to the ears and tweak them up or down a fraction as required, but even though it's all fairly sturdy, care has to be taken [the pics will show why care is needed]

I have found that no two panels are exactly the same when it comes to focus, but they are pretty close to each other, and even though you might spot a loss of focus on the test pattern or on-screen computer text, you will be hard pressed to spot it in a picture.

There's no way to measure the height of an existing panel, there's no references to measure from/to, besides, they're all a bit different from each other.

The 'tab' you mention at one end is another mystery. It rotates the filter that sits immediately on top of the sxrd surface, a few degrees either way.

My initial thoughts were that the filter was a polarizer and that it's position would affect screen brightness - or something.

But after stuffing around with a good s/hand panel and with a camera on the screen connected to a laptop so I could see what was happening while I twiddled at the back of the set, I couldn't see any difference in the test pattern no matter what I did??

Of all the panels I have looked at, new and used, the tab is sitting exactly at the mid point [as best judged by eye] and seem to be factory set at this position.

When I first tried to move the one I experimented with, it resisted being moved, then I pushed a bit harder and it moved a little and I could move it back and forth with not too much effort, but only over a small range.

Then as I wriggled it back and forth with a bit more effort, it became easier to move over a larger range, eventualy I could move it over the full range.

It's as though it had been 'fixed' in this position by the factory. I tried this on another one and it was exactly the same.

On an original panel, that tab is stuck to the frame with some adhesive [very hard adhesive] so you have to pry it free first with a small flat blade screwdriver before you can remove the panel.

It pops off without too much effort

Here's a couple of pics of a dead one I pulled apart with the heatsink removed from the back as well, it's just glued on with some rubbery black adhesive.

panel1.jpg

panel2.jpg

As for the UV filter, I'm not sure which part of the filter assembly qualifies as the 'UV filter'. I would expect it to be the very first sheet of glass that the light shines through.

The only one I changed was the cooked one which actually seems to be some kind of plastic as shown in an earlier pic, for a plain piece of 3mm glass.

This sheet will/should kill uv as well, as even ordinary plain, clear glass is opaque to UVB and UVC, and almost opaque to UVA. It's very hard to get sunburnt through a sheet of glass.

I did try to change the first sheet in the assembly with the glass out of a 85mm uv camera filter, but it's very thin glass of about 1.1mm and very difficult to cut to size. Balcatta Glass tried and failed - it shattered.

The original sheet of glass in the filter is even thinner at about 0.7mm and sits at an angle in a frame that is to some extent, slotted for that thickness glass, so I doubt that I had any chance of getting 1.1mm glass to fit anyway.

My original piece has a reddish tinge to it when viewed at an angle, like it is sunburnt, but I viewed the on screen pic with it in, then with it out, then with it in again and be ....if I could see any difference, so I left it as-is.

As for the new panels on ebay, no, I never had any success with them. Perhaps if you were to change only the blue panel, some viewers might not notice the degradation, but changing all three was a disaster of epic proportions.

Perhaps there are new panels from other suppliers on ebay that do work correctly, but I'll be sticking with good used original red or green panels.

Thanks all for sharing your interest and thoughts here.

Stay tuned for more pics and stories

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Here is a pic of which way the image will move on the screen when you move the panel as viewed from the heatsink side of the panel.

The panel is shown with a jig I made up, mounted to the frame.

Most of the below story only applies if your doing the adjustment by trail and error method as against on-the-fly projecting onto the ceiling.

I made the jig out of 1/8" square brass bar, held together at the joins with 1.6mm screws, two more 1.6mm screws that passed through two bars [one each side] to clamped the jig to the panel frame, another longer 1.6mm screw for horizontal adjustment and two 1.6mm x 3mm grub screws for vertical adjustment.

Had to find a 0.7mm allen key to adjust the grub screws.

The jig, when mounted on the green panel, only just fitted into the OB, which is why I used 3mm long grub screws so their length could be totally contained within the bar.

Drilling 1.3mm holes and tapping them to 1.6mm took some patience, but after a couple of holes, I realized an easier way.

After drilling the 1.3mm hole, I would leave the bar in the drill press vice [bought a precision vice for this job] and without moving anything, replaced the drill with the tap, removed the belt off the drill press spindle so I could freely rotate it, then brought the tap into gentle contact with the hole and rotated the spindle back and forth to cut the thread.

You have to be gentle with a little tap like this. Managed to do all the holes without breaking it.

But seriously, leave red and green alone, change only the blue panel.

One thing that sucked me into thinking I was on a good path changing all three panels for new ones was that the test pattern looked fine....the end pq however....groan.

As you can see, for blue, left and right remain the right way round, top and bottom are flipped i.e. moving the panel down causes the image to go up on the screen.

blue_panel.jpg

The jig is a good thing, but can introduce other variables, such as:

You have convergence looking really good, you take the jig off only to discover that the convergence has moved.

This is because when you tightened the jig clamps, the frame flexed a little. When you loosen the jig clamps, the frame flexes back again which moves the panel a tiny amount.

You don't seem to be getting anywhere then suddenly it's moved too much, because the jig has been moving instead of the panel.

Regardless of whether you use a jig or not, you have the panel mount screws just snug, convergence looks really good, then you tighten the screws only to discover that the convergence has moved waaay off.

This can happen because the underside of the screw head is not making flush contact with the panel metal and as you tighten the screw, it drags on one side or the other and drags the panel with it.........@#$#$.........%^&*&*

I eventually used little bits of double sided, thin foam tape on the clamp bars to hold the jig from moving and to have some padding so as not to flex the frame.

And then:

You start to forget whether your putting the set together to check an adjustment, or are pulling it apart to make an adjustment [distraction] and/or if adjusting, which side by how much and in what direction.

In my case because I mucked around with all three panels - which color in what direction and by how much..... you know it's time to go to bed!!

Another 'gottcha' and something you should check first, is have you got enough free movement in all directions around the mounting screws such that alignment can be achieved.

I've had to drill the holes a tad bigger on a few panels I've tried. The standard size is 2.2mm and on some panels I've had to go out to 2.4mm to have enough free movement.

All in all, the jig was a great help. When I figured out how to use it right it did give predictable movement and on occasions I could get perfect convergence with it.

Eventually though, I would adjust until the lines were starting to overlap a little, then tighten the panel screws and use a small screwdriver to flex the panel a tad either way.

Use the diagonal cross pattern to start with, the square crosshatch is too dense with too many lines. I was initially adjusting to the crosshatch, had it looking good only to discover I was actually one whole square out horizontally....d'oh!!

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Pixel,

When I first read your last post I was little lost at what you where doing. I think after reading it 2 or 3 times I worked out what was happening.

Using your jig you can push the panel around to align it. Great idea.

That was one of the things I was trying to work out, how to move the panel by hand. Only question left is how did you get the focus sorted, was it only by eye/manually adjustments? Also, it might be hard to see in the photo but I can only see that you can only push the panel down and to the left. Am I correct on this? Does this mean you start with the panel in the bottom right (Screen) of the alignment?

MLXXX - I am in two minds about dismantling the second TV. But if I have already removed a the two good panels there is really no way that the set will work again. Using an "open" set and a jig we should be able to align the panels easily. Pixel are you willing to build a second jig?

BTW - I am in Melbourne and yes I am always on the look out for more retired SXRD TVs. I guess I am a hoarder :hyper:

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MLXXX - I am in two minds about dismantling the second TV. But if I have already removed a the two good panels there is really no way that the set will work again.

Well to get the set to work again you'd need someone else's optical block with Red and Green still functional, and a source of a third subpanel to align and use for Blue.

On the other hand, as you are contemplating, this set may be a good candidate to be mutilated by way of opening it up for projecting onto the ceiling, to assist in OB repairs for other sets.

Using an "open" set and a jig we should be able to align the panels easily.

It amazes me Pixels wasn't sent mad by his initial technique of:

[dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]1, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]2, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]3, ..., [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]19, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]20.

Pixel are you willing to build a second jig?

Pixels will no doubt have a more educated opinion on the utility of a jig for your purposes, than I. However I would have thought projecting onto the ceiling could make the jig redundant, particularly as removing the jig can affect the alignment.

BTW - I am in Melbourne and yes I am always on the look out for more retired SXRD TVs. I guess I am a hoarder :hyper:

My interest in becoming involved is at the mild end of the spectrum. My reasons for being only mildly interested are:

1. Private interstate transportation of a bulky 60" SXRD (weighing around 50kg), would be costly.

2. Interstate transportation of an OB for a 60" SXRD would be much easier, and cheaper, but then I would need to do disassembly and reassembly, which from looking at the YouTube video I linked to above is not immediately straightforward. Feasible, but I would probably need to set aside a day to do these procedures with care so as to avoid damage.

3. I have already updated to a 65" display (a 4k Sony panel) which offers better contrast, and good colour, and does not exhibit:

  • silk screen effect,
  • vignetting,
  • slight geometrical distortions,
  • somewhat less than 1920x1080 displayed pixels (due to optical overscan).
Edited by MLXXX

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What a saga indeed :lol:

This begs the question - was it worth it - you bet!!

Whilst sxrd is not without it's minuses, when adjusted properly and driven with good, high bandwidth source e.g. bluray, the pq is simply stunning!

There have been times of late, where for a fleeting moment, the brain [what's left of it! :) ] has done a back-flip because it has been sucked into believing that it's actually there at the scene, not just watching a picture of the scene.

Would I do it all again - you bet - and in a fraction of the time!

There is something quite special about the colour from the ultra high pressure lamp. It's a broad spectrum, filtered of course by the filters in the OB, but I find there is a realism particularly with certain outdoor scenes that is very impressive (regardless of how the measurements of colour accuracy look on paper).

I was stunned by the greens and by the look of outdoor scenes when I first saw the SXRDs in late 2006, when fed Blu-ray video. The colour surpassed any other displays on the market at that time, for my eyes.

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On ‎7‎/‎12‎/‎2014 at 9:00 AM, AnthonyP69 said:

Only question left is how did you get the focus sorted, was it only by eye/manually adjustments?

Hi crew, sorry for my absence [more dead plc's]

Yes, focus was also trial and error manual adjustment.

Here's a pic of the red panel without the jig - easier to see the frame mount arrangement.

red_panel.jpg

If a panel was out of focus a bit, I would test which way it had to go by backing the mounting screws out 1/8 - 1/4 of a turn from tight and seeing if the focus was better or worse. The rubber dust seal is pushing against the panel and this will keep the panel against the screw heads as you loosen them.

It was usually only one side

that needed a tweak. I would then support the 'solder' join with a small pair of vice grips and then use a small screwdriver to lever the mounting arm higher, or use another pair of small vice grips to squish it down a tad, with the vice grips adjusted so they just pressed only a small amount when fully closed.

I would then test this, make sure it was at least the same or getting better and if I needed to go more, then simply adjust the vice grips to close a little more firmly on the mounting points.

Levering a mount higher with a small screwdriver was even more 'unscientific' - very hard to judge how much pressure - but if you went too much you could always squash it down again.

It was all very 'agricultural'... attacking the OB with vice grips!!

But I emphasize again, if the blue test pattern lines are only a little thicker than red or green, then don't worry about it. You might 'just' notice it in computer text, but you certainly won't pick it in a movie.

As I mentioned in an earlier post, Sony didn't get the focus right on mine at all!

I'm using htpc as a tuner and had to adjust all three of my panels. Focus was ok at extreme right, but got worse to the left. At extreme left it was absolutely hopeless on computer text, barely readable, but movie still looked fine.

On ‎7‎/‎12‎/‎2014 at 9:00 AM, AnthonyP69 said:

Also, it might be hard to see in the photo but I can only see that you can only push the panel down and to the left. Am I correct on this? Does this mean you start with the panel in the bottom right (Screen) of the alignment?

Yes, that's correct, they can only push down and across.

As ML correctly said, if your going to do the adjustment by projecting onto a ceiling [much preferred method], then the jig is redundant as you cannot get to the grub screws unless you pull the OB apart again. If you do that, your half way back to trial and error method.

On ‎8‎/‎12‎/‎2014 at 10:46 AM, MLXXX said:

Well to get the set to work again you'd need someone else's optical block with Red and Green still functional, and a source of a third subpanel to align and use for Blue.

On the other hand, as you are contemplating, this set may be a good candidate to be mutilated by way of opening it up for projecting onto the ceiling, to assist in OB repairs for other sets.

You could get the set back to working again, but to adjust red and green means using the tedious trial and error method, as there's no way of carving up the OB to get to these two panels 'on-the-fly'

On ‎8‎/‎12‎/‎2014 at 10:46 AM, MLXXX said:

It amazes me Pixels wasn't sent mad by his initial technique of:

[dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]1, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]2, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]3, ..., [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]19, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]20.

Waddayamean 'initial' technique - it was my only technique - and you have only listed to 20 times. That would only partly account for initial 'warm-up refinement of procedure' time - add another zero.....at least :frantics::D

But seriously, all my pain was largely self inflicted by messing with all 3 panels + the 'new' panels just didn't deliver which really magnified the pain.

Though I was destined to have to mess with all three panels anyway to get the focus right, as it's very hard/impossible to do much about adjusting focus with the panel still mounted.

Here's a pic of the green panel movement v. on-screen movement - exactly the same.

green_panel.jpg

More soon :)

Edited by Pixels
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Waddayamean 'initial' technique - it was my only technique - and you have only listed to 20 times. That would only partly account for initial 'warm-up refinement of procedure' time - add another zero.....at least :frantics::D

But seriously, all my pain was largely self inflicted by messing with all 3 panels + the 'new' panels just didn't deliver which really magnified the pain.

Though I was destined to have to mess with all three panels anyway to get the focus right, as it's very hard/impossible to do much about adjusting focus with the panel still mounted.

I thought 20 times might have been a considerable underestimate!

So, crew leader Pixels, in the end how fast could you dissassemble the set to access the OB, and how fast could you then reassemble it to test the effect of adjusting the OB? You'd have to be the fastest in the southern hemisphere, I'd suspect!

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Ah, ok, the jig came about very early in the process. After just a few times of OB out - OB in, it was patently clear that I would never get it right by moving the panel by hand with on-screen assessment.

I did time myself on a couple of occasions and had the turnaround time down to about 15 mins, roughly 5 mins pull apart, 5 mins adjusting, 5 mins put back together.

This trimming of all 'unnecessary fat' happened almost immediately. No brackets, no supports, just one screw holding the ballast and a handful of plugs and the OB was out, then the 3 ribbons plus a couple more screws and the lens assembly was out ready for a tweak.

Here's a couple more pics of the focus achieved on the new blue panel as compared to the 'way out of focus' original red.

The quality of the pics is pretty poor. Close range in this light was a real test for my cheepy nokia 6720, plus there was light spraying everywhere because of missing OB covers, but it illustrates the point.

The pic is of the diagonal test pattern in the lower left corner of the screen.

As you can see, red is so far wrong it's starting to break into a pair of tram lines!

Over on the right side of the screen, red was pretty good with individual dots making up the diagonal line quite visible.

The pic of red also shows drop-outs in the line. This is simply because one trace in the ribbon cable is not making good contact in the connector.

This happened to me a few times. Just clean the ribbon and socket with circuit board cleaner [flux remover] and all will be good again.

new_blue.jpg

orig_red.jpg

Back with more soon :)

Edited by Pixels

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Good to see the excellent SXRD is being revived!

I was planning to rebuild my 60" but simply don't have time.

Anyone interested. The unit is working and has developed the green burn as described here.

In South West Sydney. PM me asap if anyone is interested.

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Hi crew, just passing, saw your lights on.

The set is running beautifully. Hasn't missed a beat since the hiding I gave it [that nearly killed it!]

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Hi Pixels,

Yes I haven't started on my SXRD optical block rebuild.

Anyway is there anyone out there that wants to get rid of their SXRD TV or just their optical blocks?

Thanks

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Hi Crew, well this was a waltz down memory lane!! I just re-read the entire thread, my blood ran cold recounting the nightmares, then cracked up laughing at ML's comment above

"It amazes me Pixels wasn't sent mad by his initial technique of:

[dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]1, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]2, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]3, ..., [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]19, [dissassemble the TV, adjust, reassemble the TV, observe the alignment]20."

Then with me adding

"Waddayamean 'initial' technique - it was my only technique - and you have only listed to 20 times. That would only partly account for initial 'warm-up refinement of procedure' time - add another zero.....at least :frantics::D

Anyway, I'm happy to report that the sxrd is doing just fine and has now clocked up a total of just over 24,000 hours.

The current lamp has clocked 6071 hours and is still burning bright and that's with power saver off and cooling mode normal. The panel has been prompting me to fit another lamp, but nah, I'll keep running it 'till it's obviously getting low on peak white.

I know I can get rid of the prompt by telling it that I have fitted a new lamp, but that would also reset the hours which I want to keep track of. The prompt is only there momentarily at power on anyway, so, no big.

There may be other reasons why this lamp is lasting well, but I'll happily delude myself into believing it's because of my added heat sinking on the lamp heat exchanger.  :)

I've more than doubled the total hours of the set and there's not a hint of blue falling off the cliff like it did at 10,000 hours, so again, I'll happily delude myself that it's because of my fitting a plain piece of glass in place of the cooked [crushing peak white] plastic in the lamp filter assembly which in turn has helped to stop the uv from killing the blue panel.

So, whilst it was painful......who am I kidding......near suicidal!! to achieve this result, it has been immensely rewarding and I feel the set has many more hours/years of amazing viewing in it yet.

Out of interest, am I the only sxrd'er left standing on the sxrd hill?? A lone flag bearer :)

 

Edited by Pixels
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I can remember the thrill of first seeing an SXRD in a showroom hooked up to a Blu-ray source. That was way back in December 2006. I had never before seen such amazing colour from a TV set. I knew it was the set for me.

A few months ago I reluctantly disassembled my 60" SXRD. Its innards are stored in my garage as a potential source of spare parts for anyone like Pixels who still has a working set!

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