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Sony Vpl-500Es First 4K Projector With Hdmi V2.0

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Sony claim (at http://www.sony.co.u...atures#features):

  • Reality Creation: upscales your movies to 4K
    As well as native 4K material, you can see your current Full HD Blu-ray™ or DVD movie collection upscaled for a 4K experience. Reality Creation is a Super Resolution technology that radically enhances Full HD content, even upscaling 3D movies for 4K.

  • Compatible with ‘Mastered in 4K’ Blu-ray™ discs
    Drawing on the same technology used to downscale 4K material for Full HD, the VPL-VW500ES gives you a near native 4K experience with discs ‘Mastered in 4K’. It’s as close as you can get to the 4K-pixel resolution and expanded colour range of the original.

The AVS review (http://www.avforums....42-post1.html) relevantly says:

The VW500 also features Sony’s proprietary 4K upscaler called Reality Creation, which is designed to enhance high definition 1080p content, allowing viewers to enjoy 4K images with their existing Blu-ray Discs, even in 3D. Furthermore, the VW500 has an original 4K up-scaling algorithm designed for “Mastered in 4K” Blu-ray Discs from Sony Pictures Entertainment, which is supposed to enable a more accurate 4K native picture quality when upscaling. We remain somewhat skeptical of these claims but there was no denying that upscaled Blu-rays looked superb when we had a private demo of the VW500. ...

Well that's all the specifications covered, the real question is how did it look in action? In a word - breathtaking. We were treated to some beautifully shot 4K footage of Africa and, projected onto a very large screen, the benefits of 4K were clear to see. The image accuracy, the brightness, the blacks and the sheer amount of detail on display was just staggering. The demonstration was using the dynamic iris but there were no obvious shifts in brightness as it opened and closed, resulting in impressive dynamic range. We then watched the trailer for
Elysium
in 4K and, again, it looked incredible, although we did see some slight judder in the fast camera moves, which may have been caused by the server Sony was using.

When we moved on to upscaled Blu-rays the Reality Creation engine really came into its own, taking full advantage of the higher resolution panel to deliver images that you would almost believe were native 4K. Sony used the 'Mastered in 4K' copy of
The Amazing Spider-man
and whilst some of Sony's claims regarding these Blu-ray discs are slightly dubious, there's no denying it looked superb on the VW500. The images were bright, blacks looked deep, colours natural and there was a fantastic level of detail without any noticeable processing. Despite its relative brightness, the VW500 was also a very quiet projector and at no point during the demo were we aware of the projector's presence.

I don't see precise mention of "extra detail", but I do see mention by Sony of "a Super Resolution technology that radically enhances Full HD content" and by the AVS assistant editor of "a fantastic level of detail without any noticeable processing". What image enhancing algorithms typically do is to boost the contrast of (i.e. exaggerate) existing detail, rather as audio treble boost gives a brighter, crisper sound. This sometimes creates visible artefacts (false visual effects) in the process, such as I pointed out in my previous post in this thread where the left and top edges of the narrow window were artificially exaggerated, thus departing from reality. [Perhaps Sony should call their algorithm "Irreality Creation"!]

To the human eye, improved contrast looks "sharper", or subjectively "more detailed" even though careful examination of features in the enhanced image will reveal no additional true detail. [One could ask: how could there be true detail in the upscaled version that was not present in the low resolutionm source?]

If viewing at as considerable distance, faint detail too faint to be readiy seen by the human eye may become visible with contrast enhancement. Another approach is to sit nearer to the display, or to use a larger display.

I myself like to sit close to a video image, so I can see faint detail.

In the future, computers using artificial intelligence may be able to draw in extra detail creatively rather as a human artist might create an artist's impression of a new building from an architect's plans or sketches; or a detailed coloured image from a blurry black and white photo, based on informed guesses as to what parts of the image were what colour. However upscaling algorithms in use at the moment in domestic displays are not as sophisticated as that. They selectively boost contrast where there is a detected transition in the source (e.g. a detected edge). The better algorithms minimise artefacts. It is a balancing act between "enhancing" and "distorting".

Edited by MLXXX

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Marketing speils are such a classic!

Same Forum:

The flag ship model

http://www.avforums....295/Review.html

"As you would expect from a flagship projector, the VW1000 has a host of useful features including Sony’s new lens memory function, called Picture Position, and a very flexible panel alignment control. The remote has some useful buttons, a backlight and is intuitive to use, whilst the two pairs of active shutter glasses included are well designed and more tolerant to tilting your head than previous Sony models. The menu system is concise and sensibly laid out and Sony have finally used the correct names for some of the key calibration settings. The Reference picture preset proved to be quite accurate out-of-the-box and the VW1000 could deliver a reference greyscale after calibration. However the lack of a Colour Management System (CMS) is inexcusable in a projector at this price point; Sony need to address this as soon as possible because it prevents the VW1000 from achieving a reference status. It’s worth noting that the VW1000 is quite large which might make installation problematic but for a projector this large and bright, it was surprisingly quiet in low lamp mode.

In direct comparison with the JVC DLA-X70, we found that whilst the VW1000‘s higher resolution was visible when close to the screen, both images were very similar when watched at a normal viewing distance. Inevitably, despite Sony’s advances in this area, the JVC had better blacks and it also had a more accurate colour space thanks to its built-in CMS. Conversely the VW1000’s higher lumens allowed it really light up our nine foot wide 2.35:1 screen, delivering an image that had plenty of punch. When it came to motion handling both projectors were very good, which is surprising when you consider their respective technology's weakness in this area. Whilst the 2D comparison resulted in a draw, the VW1000 was clearly better in terms of its 3D performance, with the JVC lacking the same level of brightness and suffering from occasional crosstalk. Of course, there is one other major difference between the VW1000 and the X70 and that's the price, with the X70 costing £10,000 less. In terms of 2D performance the X70 remains our reference projector and despite the VW1000's existence, don't be tempted to sit on the fence and wait for 4K because 1080p will remain the de facto standard for at least the next five years.

Despite the paucity of 4K video content we were at least able to experience a 4K demo in our reference home cinema, thanks to the efforts of Tak Nakane from Sony. He drove up with one of their high powered 4K PCs in the boot of his car and we were able to watch various 4K clips on the VW1000. Obviously we have no real point of reference at the moment but needless to say these 4K clips looked absolutely spectacular, with a level of detail that needs to be seen to be believed. When we went right up to the screen, we still couldn't really see the pixel structure, even on our nine foot wide 2.35:1 screen. Aside from the breathtaking detail, the 4K images were also bright and precisely defined, with rich colours and solid blacks. There was some judder on movement in certain scenes but this was clearly a limitation of the PC rather than an issue with the projector itself. Whilst there might not be a viable 4K delivery system available at the moment, we felt privileged to see a glimpse of the future and the future looked damn good!

However, this review isn't about what you might one day see on the VW1000, it's about what you can see right now and that means upscaling 1080p content to 4K resolution. Here at least we do have a point of reference in the shape of JVC's DLA-X70. Whilst the X70 uses a 1080p panel and cannot accept a 4K input, JVC's e-shift device does mean that its projected image has a higher pixel count than that of high definition. This device takes the image from the 1080p panel and physically 'shifts' it half a pixel diagonally and then combines the two images through a processing algorithm. You can find more detail about the e-shift device in Phil's review of the JVC DLA-X70 here. This means that both projectors are taking a 1080p input and creating a new image composed of a higher number of pixels. In the case of the VW1000 it is by traditionally scaling the input up to the native 4K resolution of the panel and in the case of the JVC, through the use of the e-shift device. Whilst their respective approaches might be different, the result is that at a normal viewing distance, their perceived resolution should be comparable. We set both projectors in our reference home cinema and used their cross hair test patterns to match the two images perfectly. We calibrated the colour temperature on both projectors to D65 and in the case of the JVC we also calibrated the colour space to Rec.709 (remember there is no CMS on the VW1000). We then fed them the exact same signal using the dual HDMI outputs from an Oppo BDP-93 and identical HDMI cables. This allowed us to instantly flip back and forth between the two images using a piece of black card.

First we checked the upscaling performance of the VW1000 by watching familiar pieces of 1080p footage. In previous demonstrations of the VW1000 we had felt that the picture had a slightly 'digital' feel, that blacks were crushed, shadow detail was absent and the image lacked dynamic range. This was certainly not the case with the VW1000 that was now in our reference home cinema. The images we were seeing were very bright but not at the expense of black levels or shadow detail and there was an impressive dynamic range. Sony has made advances in their native black levels recently and this was evident on the VW1000. The Reality Creation engine was doing a superb job of scaling and processing the 1080p signal, delivering well defined images that squeezed every last drop of detail out of the high definition Blu-rays we were watching. Despite our best efforts we couldn't see any scaling artefacts and nor did the images appear 'digital' in nature, retaining their grain and a lovely film-like quality. We also found the motion handling was far better than we expected, based on our previous experience of SXRD projectors. There was far less smearing on camera pans than we were used to and the motion handling had a far more DLP look to it. The colours also looked good, if a touch over saturated and overall we found ourselves really enjoying the images that the VW1000 produced. In fact the projector's brightness and resolution brought out the best in our nine foot wide 2.35:1 screen.

The fact that the VW1000 looked great was good news but frankly it should be impressive for £17,000. The question was, how did it compare to the JVC DLA-X70? Well obviously if you went right up to the screen you could clearly see that the VW1000 had a much higher resolution but at any normal viewing distance, there was no visible difference in resolution between the two projectors. Both were capable of delivering detailed and artefact free upscaled images when fed a 1080p signal. Motion handling has never been a strong point of the LCoS technology that Sony's SXRD and JVC's D-ILA use, but both projectors performed very well in this area. There was none of the smearing we would expect to see and motion had a judder free and nicely film-like quality. In direct comparisons, the X70 clearly had better blacks but given its a JVC that should come as no surprise and thanks to the built-in CMS, the X70's colour space was obviously more accurate. However the VW1000's higher lumens meant its images were brighter and had slightly more punch to them. The VW1000 was also noticeably quieter, which considering how bright it could be was surprising. Aside from 4K, the two projectors also have a near identical set of features, including lens memory and detailed panel alignment. In overall terms of image performance there was very little to separate the two projectors and we would be happy to have either projector in our home cinema. There is however one major difference between the two projectors, the JVC DLA-X70 is £10,000 cheaper."

I'm not anti-4K far from it.....I will jump aboard too when the 4K source material is on stream.....and by then most of the bugs in both hardware and software worked out...and dare I say prices are at a more reasonable level.

Edited by Highjinx

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To explain how video works I'll draw an analogy to audio.

For audio we strive for a flat amplitude response extending to 20KHz.

For 1080 video the ideal performance would be a flat amplitude response (contrast response) extending to spatial frequencies equal to 1920 lines per picture width or 1080 lines per picture height, the theoretical limit of resolution.

What we actually get is a response that starts to fall off slowly at about 500 lines per picture width (250 per picture height), to be about 3db down at spatial frequencies equal to about 1500 lines per picture width (750 height). After that response falls of very rapidly to be about 12db down at 1920 lines per picture width (1080 height), the limit of the 1920x1080 format.

To equate this to audio, response would begin to fall off at about 5KHz and be about 3db down at 15KHz. After that response would fall rapidly to be 12db down at 20KHz.

For those not accustomed to the db scale a 3db drop represents a halving of output. At 12db down the output is only 12% of what it should be.

Put simply, the higher the spatial frequency (finer the detail) the lower the contrast of the detail in the on screen image. Our eyes need high contrast between details for us to be able to see them so visible detail suffers.

So its clear that for video, response is FAR from flat, and the fall off is deliberate to ensure that frequencies beyond the sampling limit are filtered out so they cant cause aliasing.

We regularly use equalisation to help flatten the in room response of our audio systems so why not do the same to video? Applying sharpening is the same as turning up the treble control on your audio system, nothing more, nothing less. The intent should be to get a flatter response not a hump in the response curve so that treble (detail in video) is exaggerated.

Applying too much boost results in an unrealistic picture or sound and can also lead to unpleasant side effects so moderation is the name of the game. A little can be very good, a lot can be nasty.

Edge enhancement in video is quite different to sharpening and is basically just distortion, it should be avoided IMHO.

The typical sharpness control in your TV or projector is boosting the higher frequencies and has little affect on the mid range. Sony's Reality Creation and the extra sharpening in JVC E-Shift models also affect mid range frequencies in various ways which can be helpful.

The Darbee has relatively little boost at high frequencies and concentrates a lot of its efforts on lower mid to upper mid frequencies, which is unusual and can be useful if used in moderation. Using it in conjunction with the standard sharpening in a projector gives one some control over the shape of the boost curve which is better than either system on its own. Again the trick is moderation, don’t try for a look that is dramatically sharper as that would be not realistic and has negative side effects.

As with audio equalisation, many people like to pump it up. However a properly sharpened image does not look obviously different and should never look overdone or artificial.

Since the frequencies we are manipulating are well within the resolution limits of a 2k display, a 4k display is not required and cannot provide a sharper result. What does matter is how the video manipulation is achieved, thats where conventional sharpening systems are found wanting in my view.

Buying a 4k display to get a sharper 2k image is an odd approach. You are paying a lot for a sharpening system that could be applied to any 2k projector for a similar or even better result.

Comparing a 2k projector with unprocessed video to the Sony 4k or JVC E-shift models with their fancy sharpening systems is an unfair comparison. Give the 2k unit the same level of help via external processing and you will be surprised at the result. Obviously Sony and JVC would rather you not know this. :D

Edited by Owen

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Buying a 4k display to get a sharper 2k image is an odd approach. You are paying a lot for a sharpening system that could be applied to any 2k projector for a similar or even better result.

Comparing a 2k projector with unprocessed video to the Sony 4k or JVC E-shift models with their fancy sharpening systems is an unfair comparison. Give the 2k unit the same level of help via external processing and you will be surprised at the result. Obviously Sony and JVC would rather you not know this. :D

Obviously no one is buying the 4k display just to display 2k for all eternity. The PS4 is already due to be released at the end of the year and may even be launched ahead of the 500ES. I suspect with a VPN you could also get the 4k media player from the US for more content.

But in the meantime, I have to say 2k material on the Sony 1000ES is remarkable. If the processing is the only difference, why is it that Sony's range of FullHD projectors, complete with the Reality Creation engine does not even come close to the JVC RS6x projectors. Whereas the 1000ES does indeed make short work of the JVC. And it's painful coming from a JVC owner who's trying to avoid the itch to upgrade. If the 500ES even gets close to that, it would already be a better bang for the buck than JVC's flagship.

It is IMHO more than just simple sharpening at work.

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What makes you assume that the Reality Creation system in the 1000ES is the same as that used in much cheaper models? I'll bet its not, even if its only a change in sharpening parameters.

Added to that, the 1000 has a much better lens then lower model Sonys, which are not all that great for lens quality and typically below the JVC's.

The Reality Creation system in the 1000 can be turned up very high and provide very aggressive sharpening, more so than is possible with the JVC's. Will that make it look sharper, you bet, but thats not every ones cup of tea so "sharper" is not necessarily better.

The Sony is also brighter than the JVC and that will give it a more punchy look. However when both are calibrated for the same brightness, gamma and accurate rather than pumped up sharpness I'll bet they look bugger all different, other than in contrast where the JVC is ahead.

Throw a normal 2k X series JVC in for comparison, with appropriate calibration and good external video sharpening and it to will look very similar, unless the viewing angle is so large that its pixel structure becomes visible. 2k video at that size looks crappy no matter what you do with it IMHO.

Edited by Owen

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The 50ES was the Sony flagship for Full HD and was released after the 1000ES IIRC so it would have the benefit of the Reality Creation engine.

Sure the lens and optical system of the 1000ES are good as well but the effect we are seeing is IMHO more than just the impact of the optical system because you can disable the upscaling feature in the 1000ES and it is IMHO no better than the JVC with the RC disabled when projecting on the same screen and under the same conditions (source etc). I'm not sure if you have seen the Sony in action for a long enough period to criticise it as much.

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Obviously no one is buying the 4k display just to display 2k for all eternity. The PS4 is already due to be released at the end of the year and may even be launched ahead of the 500ES. I suspect with a VPN you could also get the 4k media player from the US for more content.

But in the meantime, I have to say 2k material on the Sony 1000ES is remarkable. If the processing is the only difference, why is it that Sony's range of FullHD projectors, complete with the Reality Creation engine does not even come close to the JVC RS6x projectors. Whereas the 1000ES does indeed make short work of the JVC. And it's painful coming from a JVC owner who's trying to avoid the itch to upgrade. If the 500ES even gets close to that, it would already be a better bang for the buck than JVC's flagship.

It is IMHO more than just simple sharpening at work.

the RC Engine is most definitely more than simple sharpening. The doubters really should check out a 1000es upscaling some 1080p blurays and they might change their mind.. anyway .. each to their own :)

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Its not my intention to criticise the Sony just point out what makes it tick. Its image processing that is responsible for the majority of the Sony's performance, not the projection system or the number of pixels. This is evidenced by your observation that without this processing the Sony looks just like the JVC with its processing disabled, and so it should other than in contrast ratio.

The point I am trying to make is that you can get most of the advantages of high quality upscaling and sharpening without a 4k display, you just need appropriate external processing to do it at the moment as no projector manufacturer provides it built into a 2k model. Its not in their best interest to do so as they want you to spend up on the 4K or E-Shift models by making you think its the only way to get the result. Having extra pixels in the display only really helps if you can see the pixel structure at your viewing distance.

Edited by Owen

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the RC Engine is most definitely more than simple sharpening. The doubters really should check out a 1000es upscaling some 1080p blurays and they might change their mind.. anyway .. each to their own :)

Know one said RC is simple sharpening, it most certainly is not. However its also not the only game in town if you are prepared to use external processing.

Doubters really should explore external processing options, they might change their mind. :D

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i agree that upscaling doesn't really cut it, especially if you are paying over $10k for the benefit of 4k.

i learnt recently when my old trusty 720p projector failed and i finally made the move to a 1080p projector, and i guess also reconfirmed why i originally bought a 720p projector when tvs were pushing 1080p..... native content is key.

my blurays and hd camcorder look sharper, but i wouldn't say amazingly better, seeing they still had enough data to fill a fixed pixel 720p image.

but foxtel hd and hd tv look worse, same with xbox and ps3 games.

now that ive finally got a 1080p projector i laugh about past experiences. i have had many mates come around in the past that have fox hd and 1080p projectors and they were always impressed with my setup, and then felt a bit of buyers remorse whenever i told them it was 720p.

as most consumers get focused on the resolution being the most important aspect and they forget about needing the content. not one of my mates ever pointed out the difference that mine was 720p and theirs was 1080p, not ONCE!!, but they could all perceive that mine appeared sharper than theirs did.....native content from Fox HD box force to 720p(fox sports 1080i looked the same as 720p) to native res. and sure you might think "yeah I could spot the difference", and yes you would be able to with a bit of a good look. but what im getting at is that no one ever did, because the image appeared sharp, clear, big, and NATIVE, so they never went up real close to see the pixel structure or loaded up a desktop at 1080p and couldnt read the text.

we still dont have complete 1080p content for all aspects of using a tv or projector. ps3 struggles to make all games 1080p (360 upscales...)

so only now are we going to have current consoles that provide native 1080p for movies and games(possible 4k movies in the future but not gaming, and 4k native image playback .. :-O ) hdtv broadcast may get to 1080p or skip to 4k, but i don't see that happening anytime soon here, especially with 4k

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The res will be bigger in the PC market for designers and gamers. It will take years to be utilised with TVs/Projectors used as dedicated tv and movie displays

Edited by smokenz

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hdtv broadcast may get to 1080p or skip to 4k, but i don't see that happening anytime soon here, especially with 4k

There is a common misconception that 1080i is inferior to 1080p, thats not necessarily so at all.

TV networks have been transmitting 1080p since day one of HD transmission, it just comes in an interlaced container. Simple weave deinterlacing recovers the original progressive frames without loss. 1080i can do everything 1080p can do and more, thats why its the preferred standard for TV networks and will remain so until 1080p 50 or 60 is viable.

Bluray only supports 1080p at 24 frames per second, which is useless for sport or fast action. 1080i 50 can carry 1080p 25 and 1080i 60 (as in the US) can carry 1080p 30 frames per second.

Whats more, true 1080i from an interlaced video camera deinterlaces to 50 frames per second in Oz and blows 1080p 24 away for motion. 1080p 24 is only suitable for film and content where subject and camera motion can be closely controlled by the director.

The limitation for TV in Oz has always been bandwidth, not 1080i.

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Is there any news on availability and price of this projector in Australia?

On another note have any 4k , laser/led projectors being announced recently excluding RedRay which has never come to fruition?

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i have never once seen a 1080i deinterlaced to 1080p that was equal to 1080p. even on my relatively well spec'd i7 with nvidia gtx, you can see it deinterlace, but once the motion is fast, it can't process fast enough.

i know 1080i gives the temporal resolution benefit due to the motion improvement over 24p. hence why my earlier hd video cameras had a 24p mode as well as 1080i mode, and you could match the higher shutter speed with the interlaced signal and get much smooth motion.

but say if i record a 1080i and 1080p sample on my current camera, but 50fps, the 1080p is better.

on the subject of motion. when you have a good 1080p 50/60fps camera, and most likely it will become worse as 4k supports 60fps, the motion can make you feel sick if not filmed correctly with precision. because it is so clear and fast enough to accurately display fast motion that your eyes aren't meant to see in focus, this can lead to motion sickness and is something i have experienced first hand when comparing some videos i shot on older cameras which are more forgiving to jerky camera movements.

and yeah, Australia has a major bandwidth problem. Look at how it's gone backwards with the Gem and 7Mate channels. It cringes me to see tv shows being filmed on nice HD cameras, only to be broadcast at 576i

Sorry, bit off topic then.

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i have never once seen a 1080i deinterlaced to 1080p that was equal to 1080p. even on my relatively well spec'd i7 with nvidia gtx, you can see it deinterlace, but once the motion is fast, it can't process fast enough.

Are to talking about progressive sourced 1080i or true interlaced from an interlaced video camera, the two sources are very different.

For progressive sourced 1080i 50 all we have to do is take the even line data from one field and add the odd line data from the corresponding adjacent field, combine and display the full progressive frame that we have just recreated. The process is dead simple, lossless and requires virtually zero processing power so is easy to do in software on a PC, no hardware assistance required

I have never had any problem doing perfect weave deinterlacing on a PC in software alone and never noticed any TV screw it up either. The picture quality is as good as the data rate allows. Displaying a PC desktop at 1920x1080i 50 also looks the same as 1920x1080p 50.

Bluray players can normally convert 1080p 24 to 1080i 60, and that was the default output mode for years before 1080p24 support became common. Good displays could deinterlace and convert this back to 1080p 24 with no loss by using inverse telecine and simple weave deinterlacing.

True interlaced video is a totally different animal and very difficult to deinterlaced really well. This is the only type of interlaced video that is likely to cause problems for a deinterlacing system. Even then, good old bob deinterlacing that was used for the first decade of digital TV's never produced any artefacts, its was just not as sharp as better systems.

Getting a PC to deinterlaced true interlaced content properly is actually not easy. It cant be done in software and the video decoder, video renderer, and hardware all have to cooperate fully for this to work. Additionally for Nvidia cards NV12 colour has to be used in my experience.

I would not be surprised if you have never seen fully functional hardware deinterlacing on a PC, and from what you have said I am pretty sure you haven’t as you should not be seeing visible problems.

Unless a PC and its playback system is set up properly you will see deinterlacing problems with true interlaced source. In most cases the result is second rate and easily outperformed by the deinterlacer in a decent TV or projector.

How often do you see interlaced combing artefacts when watching 576i or 1080i content on a TV using the internal tuner, I never do. Same goes for DVD movie playback, never a problem and DVD is 576i.

i know 1080i gives the temporal resolution benefit due to the motion improvement over 24p. hence why my earlier hd video cameras had a 24p mode as well as 1080i mode, and you could match the higher shutter speed with the interlaced signal and get much smooth motion.

but say if i record a 1080i and 1080p sample on my current camera, but 50fps, the 1080p is better.

1080i is just a different way of storing video data or transmitting data to the display. Think of 1080i 50 as serial transmission and 1080p 25 as parallel transmission, the same pixel data gets transferred in the same time with each. In the digital domain we can convert from progressive to interlaced and back to progressive as many times as we want without affecting the integrity of even one pixels data.

Pro video cameras have long used 1080 24psf (Progressive Segmented Frame) as a tape format, this is the same as 1080i 48 with each frame of 24fps progressive video broken into two fields. Its simply deinterlaced to 24p in post

In Oz its common to find video cameras that record 1080p 25 and store it as 1080i 50. Again its simple to deinterlace to 1080p 25 with no loss.

The motion advantage of true interlaced content with 50 motion updates per second over 24/25 progressive is plainly obvious. 50 or 60p would certainly be better again (provided camera shutter speeds are fast enough for motion not be blurred), but Bluray does not support 1080p 50/60 and no way TV networks have the bandwidth for it. 576i and 1080i will remain the formats of choice for TV networks for quite a while to come.

Edited by Owen

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So for what ever reason you may be interested in the new Sony PJ models they're Australian release and and invite to come along is enclosed in this......

PM me if your coming 3 members are already on the list so far......

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Rang Sony Australia today to see if they had pricing and a release date. Nothing yet :(

I would have asked when a worthwhile amount of 4k content would be available. It looks like any 4k display you buy now will be obsolete by the time there is a useful amount of 4k content to view on it.

Edited by Owen

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Because I have no interest in 4k due to a total lack of content, I cant find even one new 2k Bluray movie a month worth viewing. Worthwhile 4k content is zero at the moment, with maybe one or two titles in the next year.

Until Hollywood give up film I dont see much point in 4k.

Edited by Owen

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So for what ever reason you may be interested in the new Sony PJ models they're Australian release and and invite to come along is enclosed in this......

PM me if your coming 3 members are already on the list so far......

Thanks for the link. Might have to come to MEL to see. At least I know when they will be released here. Price point will be the next one which will be known in Mid November. If I come to Melbourne I might be able to also check out the Sim2 Nero 3D-2 as that is another projector I'm interested in having currently a DLP based projector myself.

I would have asked when a worthwhile amount of 4k content would be available. It looks like any 4k display you buy now will be obsolete by the time there is a useful amount of 4k content to view on it.

That doesn't bother me. In regards to the former part of your question heard the same thing being asked when DVD first landed here, then when Blu-Ray came out in the HD-DVD/Blu-Ray launches. If it comes it comes, if it doesn't this projector I'm pretty sure will allow me to watch my current Blu-Ray collection and hopefully produce a better picture than what I already have hence my questions into its release and price point.

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Thanks for the link. Might have to come to MEL to see. At least I know when they will be released here. Price point will be the next one which will be known in Mid November. If I come to Melbourne I might be able to also check out the Sim2 Nero 3D-2 as that is another projector I'm interested in having currently a DLP based projector myself.

If you do decide to join the fun you'll be the second NSW'man to come along & get a free feed to boot.

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Just a reminder that the first viewing of this PJ in OZ will be happening this Friday night at Audio Trends in Ringwood Vic for those who haven't already joined in, some 4 or 5 members will be there

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