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Viewer Access Satellite Television - Vast

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... Ultimately the reason that I can see for the pairing etc is to do everything possible to prevent the 'free for all' that is the current Aurora system.

I'm no encryption expert, however I can't see that pairing improves encryption security as Selectv sells unpaired Irdeto 5 cards (see above).

It simply makes it a bit more painful to 'move' a subscription service around a house or the country.

However I may well be wrong. :)

Pairing is generally a product of the STB ie the box is paired to the card not the other way around, so it is still possible that VAST Irdeto cards, could work in suitable other HD DVB-S2 decoders.

However the STB specification has this special 'feature' :

• support a unique identity so that only authorised set top boxes can work in the operator’s network;

So. Game, set and match to UEC!

The one thing going for the the 'special edition VAST UEC box' is that they will look after themselves; as did the several editions of UEC Aurora boxes.

From a consumers point of view, when first firing up the DSD 1421, once the lnb frequency is chosen ie 11300 or 10700 for 99%, (almost all Aurora only jobs will be 11300), the thing will just boot up and start showing pictures.

It should automatically update TP's and channels in the bouquet as they are added.

----------------

Note that this useful consumer feature IS NOT part of the specification.

Remember the early imported and very clunky SD DVB-T boxes at start up.

And compare that to a new tele or stb now. :)

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I think the UEC thing is purely for this misguided and IMHO unmanageable pairing hairbrain ideal that some bureaucrat has come up with...

What happens if you get a faulty box?

There really isn't any technical reason other manufacturers couldn't be available straight away... but the UEC rubbish is all thats available... but why aren't Strong or a bunch of other SAT STB providers complaining to the ACCC? have they been told to lay off until after the election...

Funnily enough the UEC 4121 doesn't appear in the Freeview approved products list...

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I'm no encryption expert, however I can't see that pairing improves encryption security as Selectv sells unpaired Irdeto 5 cards (see above).

Its one of the tools that can be used to defeat card sharing - and yes, card sharing VAST is a stretch - but considering the paranoia that the commercial operators appear to have its probably a valid consideration.

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I'm in that position with Aurora, and have 2 x UEC's in different rooms so we can watch other channels, so VAST will be the same.

I would have thought we could at least buy a digital tv, with inbuild sat receiver and card slot, and do it as an all in one unit, rather than having to have both an stb and a telly working at the same time. Yes, lot's would argue if something goes wrong with one, you lose the lot, however, electricity prices what they are, having one unit working only would save some dosh. I guess this is all to "left field" in this tech savvy society to contemplate? I'm certain the end user would find it easier to set up though. Terrestrial and satellite incorporated into the one digital panel...hmmm..."tell 'em your dreamin' son"!

This is a very valid point and the direction local TVs should be heading. In Japan TVs have been sold with built in satellite tuners and smartcard slots for years (you even need the smart card for the local terrestrial digital tv). Most TVs have 3 tuners, analogue, digital HD terrestrial and digital HD satellite. However, all channels are available to everyone.

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This Sunraysia Daily reports that VAST is working.

I think. :)

Black spot issues in Ouyen and Robinvale were resolved with new transmitters and more than 100 VAST satellite set-top boxes have been installed in remote areas.

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This is a very valid point and the direction local TVs should be heading. In Japan TVs have been sold with built in satellite tuners and smartcard slots for years (you even need the smart card for the local terrestrial digital tv). Most TVs have 3 tuners, analogue, digital HD terrestrial and digital HD satellite. However, all channels are available to everyone.

I pinched this from http://www.apsattv.com/ ....thanks Craig. Not exactly what I ask for but a step in the right direction..

Secret Samsung TV With 1TB Of Storage To Be Launched In OZ

From http://www.channelnews.com.au/Display/Industry/B4W9U8V8

A brand new HD TV is set to be launched in Australia that includes a 1 terabyte hard drive, IP connectivity, built-in Foxtel, Telstra BigPond movies as well as 3D TV technology.

The TV, which will be manufactured by Samsung, has already been shown to Australian content companies during a recent visit to Korea.

Samsung believes that the future for TVs in Australia is a combination of content which can be easily accessed from the screen, Internet connectivity, 3D technology and the integration of storage that allows consumers to record content. The TV will also allow external storage devices to be attached.

Samsung sources have told SmartHouse that the project has been in development for some time.

Tipped to be launched early in 2011 the new Samsung TV will give consumers the choice of having access to Telstra BigPond movies and Foxtel content as well as content from a multitude of other sources. To access the Foxtel and BigPond movie service Samsung customers will also have to buy a BigPond broadband package.

If released in 2011 the Samsung TV could also incorporate the new HDBaseT, cable connector which transfers audio and video signals over Ethernet cables as opposed to the traditional HDMI Cable.

The HDBaseT, cable connector which has been developed by a consortium of companies including LG, Samsung, Sony and Valens Semiconductor is set to set to appear in products later this year.

A key benefit of the new TV is that it eliminates the need for an external personal video recorder, set top box or Foxtel PVR. Everything will be built into the TV, say Samsung executives who have been working on the project.

Earlier this week Telstra announced that they are to offer Foxtel as part of their T Box offering. This will give consumers access to over 1400 movies as well as daily Foxtel content.

Shortly, Samsung Australia will launch a new 9 Series LED TV. The device, which is due to go on sale in the last quarter of 2010, has been described as a "sensational" TV by people who have seen it.

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Samsung sources have told SmartHouse that the project has been in development for some time.

If Outhouse has anything to do with this, I would be viewing it with a sceptical eye for the moment...

If this is true however, it is an interesting move by the industry, especially building Foxtel into it (presumably it would be cable given that bigpond gets a mention :unsure: ).

I wonder if it will be 'FreeSpew' infected/crippled too (and/or some other form of DRM as requested by Telstra/News Ltd.)... :unsure: ?

Cheers,

ChaosMaster.

Edited by ChaosMaster

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Will,

The criteria is a population of 500 people...

None of the sites you mention are under 500 people...

We will have to wait until to see how the DBCDE reacts in this situation...

We did not need to wait for very long. The DBCDE has decided that Melrose/Wilmington and Orroroo are going to have VAST inflicted upon them.

http://www.digitalready.gov.au/subsidy/Default.aspx

This will not go down well in any of the towns affected. The picture used to illustrate "Regional South Australia" looks like it was taken somewhere like Oodnadatta. This is a Canberra public servant's attempt to depict these places as "remote" to suit their treatment by the DBCDE/ACMA. I was only in Wilmington on the June long weekend and I drove through Melrose. They do not look like Oodnadatta; they look civilised and rural and green, especially after some good recent rain.

Once the people decode the letters that they will receive next week and realise that they are not just getting "normal" digital telelvision like they have over the hills in Port Pirie or up the road in Quorn, but are going to need a satellite dish per house and a decoder per TV set and some pay-TV-style access card to be able to use them, most of them are going to be really, really pissed off.

Unless this is some pre-planned political stunt, so that Julia Gillard can ride into Melrose on a white horse and save TV for everyone, this is going to get very ugly. For starters, I think the local councils (who paid for and own the local translators) may have something to say about the DBCDE or whoever making this announcement before the councils have announced what they have decided to do.

Regards,

Will

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Will,

Oodnadatta is in remote viewing area which consists of northern and Western SA, NT, Inland Qld, Inland NSW (excluding Broken Hill) and blackspots.

Any community funded translators which are not converted to digital by the broadcasters will have their audience subsidised for satellite receivers.

Spencer Gulf Licence Area This is the area which are allowed to repeat the Port Pirie programs.

AlanH

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Alan,

I think you have missed Will's point*.

The type of reception for the areas mentioned (Oodnadatta was not in that mix, it referred only to the picture used for illustration on a government web site) is being presented in a non consultative way.

I'll be in the area this weekend, and hope I might get to see one of those letters.

*(correct me if I am wrong)

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Once the people decode the letters that they will receive next week and realise that they are not just getting "normal" digital telelvision like they have over the hills in Port Pirie or up the road in Quorn, but are going to need a satellite dish per house and a decoder per TV set and some pay-TV-style access card to be able to use them, most of them are going to be really, really pissed off.

If you're in regional SA, I'd be pleading to be part of VAST - I don't see WIN or GTS/BKN ever providing all the multichannels you will get from VAST, so it will be those with the terrestrial reception that are worse off not the other way around. I mean GTS/BKN don't even do a Nine station and I haven't heard any word of that changing.

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If you're in regional SA, I'd be pleading to be part of VAST - I don't see WIN or GTS/BKN ever providing all the multichannels you will get from VAST, so it will be those with the terrestrial reception that are worse off not the other way around. I mean GTS/BKN don't even do a Nine station and I haven't heard any word of that changing.

I partly agree. I agree that initially, those with VAST will receive more channels than those with terrestrial reception. However, for those who will retain terrestrial reception, there are two arguments not to plead for VAST:

One argument is that the advantage of more channels could be short-lived. Once analogue is switched off, the broadcasters, who have been allocated three RF channels, will be under pressure to use those channels to provide a service similar to that provided in Adelaide and the eastern states. In this regard, I don't see WIN as being identical to GTS/BKN. WIN (eventually) did provide the "missing" Nine channel. Indeed, GTS/BKN have not. I think that WIN will provide additional channels quickly. I think that GTS/BKN will only do so when they are forced to do so. Once most or all channels are available terrestrially, what is the advantage of VAST?

The other argument is cost. For the average resident in Melrose, Wilmington, Orroroo or on a nearby farm, this is going to be a significant cost. Most will already have a UHF antenna pointing at the nearby hill. Many, if not most, will have the shiny, new LCD TV that they bought in part to watch widescreen DVDs and in part because of the advertisements telling them that they needed a digital TV before December. They thought that they were ready. They thought they had avoided the extra box by getting the new TV. Now they find themselves forking out big dollars for the dish and the mount for the dish and some extra special cabling and the box for the loungeroom (although they got a $400 rebate for that one) and the new cabinet (so that they could house the satellite box as well as the DVD player) and the box for the kids' room (no rebate for that one). If this is what happens, then these people will be entitled to be upset that a tiny village named Underbool in Victoria had its translator converted by the broadcasters thanks to a subsidy from the federal government. Should the feds, the council or the broadcasters fund terrestrial translators in any place that is currently subject to VAST, how will those who have already spent money on VAST equipment feel?

Regards,

Will

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Will,

Firstly, the Minister is promising that all Australians will get 16 channels. So the Spencer Gulf is able to provide the three main SD programs on a single tranmsitter. To provide the other commercial programs an additional pair of transmitters will be required on all DTV transmitter sites. When these extra transmitters will be provided is upto the broadcasters, however I would expect it must have to have prior to 2014.

The DBCDE/broadcasters deal is that the DBCDE will pay for the satellite costs and subsidies for viewers who are either current Aurora viewers or they currently use community funded transmitters which the broadcasters will not convert to digital. The broadcasters have to pay for any community funded transmitterw which are converted to digital. You are correct that the broadcasters decided to pay for translators for Underbool and for new transmitter sites at Ouyen and Robinvale.

As far as subsidies are concened I suggest you go back to post 2 in this strand and get the policies from the sources

For more information

Free to Air Satellite Service News

Consider the options, Have your community pay for 5 DTV transmitters and their maintenance or get a subsidy of $650 for a satellite receiver?

AlanH

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