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Grizzly

Silicon spray on vinyl?

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There's a letter in the current Oz HiFi magazine about the positive results of spraying aerosol silicon onto the surface of an LP and giving it a wipe. Considering there is no editorial comment about it I thought I'd throw it out there and see what the thoughts of the community are.

Edited by Bear72
typos and grammar- how embarrassing!

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Guest guru

evening bear,

record stampers are coated with a silicon spray as the blob of molten vinyl is loaded to be pressed and new records sound better and quieter after cleaning the silicon off so reapplying it seems strange.

in europe in the 80's there was a following of playing your records wet with water,the only problem is if you tried to play them dry they sounded crap.

best idea seems to be buy a good record cleaner and lots of good inner sleeves.

regards, g.

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evening bear,

record stampers are coated with a silicon spray as the blob of molten vinyl is loaded to be pressed

Could you please provide documentation of this assertion? I have been trying to track down evidence for the use of "mould release agents" for some time without success and I would like to know from you where your information comes from.

I take it that you are referring to SILICONE sprays rather than silicon. There is a meaningful difference.

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Resounding silence appears to be the reply.

So are you repeating something you read on the Internet written by someone who read something on the Internet which was written by someone else who read it on the Internet written by ..................................

The proliferation of the Urban Myth. Or do you actually know what you're talking about? If so, please share.

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Resounding silence appears to be the reply.

So are you repeating something you read on the Internet written by someone who read something on the Internet which was written by someone else who read it on the Internet written by ..................................

The proliferation of the Urban Myth. Or do you actually know what you're talking about? If so, please share.

What's the big deal, Logan?

Seems a pretty obscure detail to be getting upset about..

If you really want a definitive answer why don't you contact LP manufacturers?

Cheers

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There's a letter in the current Oz HiFi magazine about the positive results of spraying aerosol silicon onto the surface of an LP and giving it a wipe. Considering there is no editorial comment about it I thought I'd throw it out there and see what the thoughts of the community are.

I have always held the belief that NOTHING should be palced onto a vinyl recording that cannot be easily removed. Anything that leaves a residue will cause a build-up on the stylus. I have only ever used mild degergent and distilled water on any LP I've ever owned. Nothing else has helped, nor has been required.

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Guest guru
Resounding silence appears to be the reply.

So are you repeating something you read on the Internet written by someone who read something on the Internet which was written by someone else who read it on the Internet written by ..................................

The proliferation of the Urban Myth. Or do you actually know what you're talking about? If so, please share.

i was unaware you had made this post so my apologies for not immediately replying.the information came from an article written by sid marks in the absolute sound.

and as for your aggressive tone in making your second post,shove it where the sun don't shine.

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Sorry for joinning this convo too late, wasnt listenning to LPs back in 2009.

However, wanted to let know that iv'e tried DI water through WD40 and lastly SILICONE spray.

Soap and Water halped to first clean the vinyl, very carefully with soft fiber cloths, gave good results on +good- graded records. Adding WD40 shined the record very well, though did a real mess on the styli and inner sleeve, didnt harm the record nor the styli.

 

Lastly, Silicone spray resulted in the best performance of getting rid of scrathes and somehow balanced the sound pretty well, and added softness and wormth to it.

Note, just apply a round smear and wipe with soft cloth along the grooves and not against it.

 

The first time the record played, the styli equaly spreaded the silicone through the grooves, than i wiped both record and styli again and the second time played didnt required that.

 

Ofcourse it all has tested on verious low and mid end systems and heads.

Most tries were on 33.3 lp's on which scarthes are most noticeable, and the stylis nor the records didnt damage at all, i usually clean the styli anyway with alcohol after playing 5-10 records.

 

Not all records needs that method, some are too precious, or you'd like to keep some scrathes as you got used to it. But here it is, just try. At you own risk, ofcourse

 

Ori

Edited by OriCo

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On 07/05/2009 at 7:58 PM, Grizzly said:

There's a letter in the current Oz HiFi magazine about the positive results of spraying aerosol silicon onto the surface of an LP and giving it a wipe. Considering there is no editorial comment about it I thought I'd throw it out there and see what the thoughts of the community are.

Don’t do it Anthony. As Zaphod said, you will always be cleaning gunk off your stylus and your records will get noisier over time. Brings back memories of that dreadful GruvGluide product that ruined a couple of my records (permanently).

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I tend to be conservative with my record collection.  I'm reminded from the poor styli used playing records as a kid that once a record is damaged, it's damaged for life.  And there are lots of time-tested techniques for cleaning records (washing formulas are reasonably standard, then there is vacuum-cleaning and ultrasound). 

 

In audio, and in other professions, there are always people trying to make a name for themselves.  A common way to do in in the internet age is to make a proposal that hasn't been tested/researched, and present it as if it were scientifically-researched proven fact, that only the author has been clever enough to work out. 

 

Unfortunately, the "advice" often turns out to be damaging info.  But the author has achieved his/her aim - to appear to be an innovative expert.  And most people read the info in good faith, and act on the info thinking the poor-quality advice is good.  And in many cases, it's utter rubbish.  Which then makes it harder for good advice to be recognised.

 

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audiofeline - very true and also a lot of 'received wisdom' which has been around for decades and never seriously questioned but accepted as gospel turns out to be pure unadulterated b/s.

 

A few years ago visiting my local marche de jardin held in the streets, I spotted some boxed sets of classical vinyl. Couldn't believe it when I saw the boxes were in pristine condition - I had stumbled onto unplayed vinyl, all but one were from the 70s but just one was from 65. All the vinyl has a slick looking gloss which I'm guessing is mould release agents.

 

 

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Not a chance in Hades I'd ever apply anything to my records other than cleaners that were fully rinsed off with plain distilled water.

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On 18/01/2020 at 11:43 PM, OriCo said:

Sorry for joinning this convo too late, wasnt listenning to LPs back in 2009.

However, wanted to let know that iv'e tried DI water through WD40 and lastly SILICONE spray.

Soap and Water halped to first clean the vinyl, very carefully with soft fiber cloths, gave good results on +good- graded records. Adding WD40 shined the record very well, though did a real mess on the styli and inner sleeve, didnt harm the record nor the styli.

 

Lastly, Silicone spray resulted in the best performance of getting rid of scrathes and somehow balanced the sound pretty well, and added softness and wormth to it.

Note, just apply a round smear and wipe with soft cloth along the grooves and not against it.

 

The first time the record played, the styli equaly spreaded the silicone through the grooves, than i wiped both record and styli again and the second time played didnt required that.

 

Ofcourse it all has tested on verious low and mid end systems and heads.

Most tries were on 33.3 lp's on which scarthes are most noticeable, and the stylis nor the records didnt damage at all, i usually clean the styli anyway with alcohol after playing 5-10 records.

 

Not all records needs that method, some are too precious, or you'd like to keep some scrathes as you got used to it. But here it is, just try. At you own risk, ofcourse

 

Ori

 

Silicon spray is a fairly inert product, being food grade and all.

No harm in trying it on a common record to see what happens.

A little goes a long way.............

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8 hours ago, LogicprObe said:

 

Silicon spray is a fairly inert product, being food grade and all.

No harm in trying it on a common record to see what happens.

A little goes a long way.............

Yeah, I'm not risking a $7k cartridge on a whim. In addition any lp even slightly wet would have any nearby dust mote fully affixed to it.

 

I'd love to see someone proposing this to take some high res pics even with a cheap usb microscope. They take pretty good pics if you're slow & easy with the adjustments.

Play the lp after the application then take a pic of the stylus & canteleiver after 1 & another after 25 or more plays of treated lps and lets see if there's any liquid creeping up the canteleiver.

WIN_20200117_20_26_35_Pro.jpg

Edited by shawnwes

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@shawnwes while I agree with you, unless that photo is of said silicon, it's totally irrelevant. 

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I'm a tad mystified why this 10 year old thread was revived, no  chance of me trying it out either. 

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The silicon spray is a non toxic lubricant and attracts less dust than oils and  other surfactants.

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On 29/01/2020 at 12:12 AM, Southerly said:

...A few years ago visiting my local marche de jardin held in the streets, I spotted some boxed sets of classical vinyl. Couldn't believe it when I saw the boxes were in pristine condition - I had stumbled onto unplayed vinyl, all but one were from the 70s but just one was from 65. All the vinyl has a slick looking gloss which I'm guessing is mould release agents.

Or it could have been wd40, MrSheen, silicon spray, cooking oil, etc.  Given the records were from the 60/70's, there is no telling what the history was, and no guarantee that they were unplayed.  If I bought these records they would have had a very thorough washing, and I would have waited a considerable time before playing to see if anything was leeching out of the vinyl.   They could have been a great buy, or a bust.

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4 hours ago, audiofeline said:

Or it could have been wd40, MrSheen, silicon spray, cooking oil, etc.  Given the records were from the 60/70's, there is no telling what the history was, and no guarantee that they were unplayed.  If I bought these records they would have had a very thorough washing, and I would have waited a considerable time before playing to see if anything was leeching out of the vinyl.   They could have been a great buy, or a bust.

No rational person would use any of the products you mention on vinyl - cooking oil - hilarious. Plus evidence of their use would be evident on the inner sleeves. When I say the boxes were pristine, I mean just that. No matter how careful you are, especially with boxed sets, there will always be evidence of use.

 

I havn't played them, they are not the kind of classical I listen to. One set has a value of around £250 and will only be of interest to an avid collector who would certainly relish cleaning and playing from new, though I would offer to clean the 6 LPs on my Moth RCM 2 and finish with distilled water as I do my own vinyl.

 

The woman selling these sets had inherited them and I paid only €2 per set. I've been buying s/hand vinyl from the early 70s and I can tell if an LP has been 'skimmed' many don't even know what this means, let alone recognising it.

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22 hours ago, evil c said:

I'm a tad mystified why this 10 year old thread was revived, no  chance of me trying it out either. 

Me too really, and I never did.

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