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Mark Dohmann of Audio Union

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Mark Dohmann of Audio Union

8pm Wednesday 19th April, visitors welcome.

Willis Room, City of Whitehorse Offices
Maroondah Highway (Whitehorse Road), Nunawading
Melway Map 48 Ref G9
Contact: 9437 1249

 

Back in October 2013, the club was very privileged to have one of the most influential audio engineers of the analogue world present at the Melbourne Audio Club. He is Mark Dohmann and since then Mark has formed Audio Union.

 

Another first at the MAC, will be a new addition to the Thrax portfolio of equipment. The LYRA loudspeaker will make their debut at the club partnered with a pair of HEROS 100W class A mono blocks and the matching DIONYSOS pre-amp. The Lyra is a two-way, three driver monitor sporting a vented enclosure that is made of aluminium plates, screwed together.

 

The D'Appolito array on the front panel, incorporate two 6.5" woofers with magnesium membranes and copper phase plugs. The tweeter is a ring diaphragm compression driver crossed over at 1.5 kHz. Its shape was developed by Spherovox with specific directivity and frequency response.

 

Nick Karayanis

Program Co-ordinator

 

Ken Tripp
Wise and Wonderful Webmaster
Melbourne Audio Club, Inc.

http://www.melbourneaudioclub.org.au

Edited by KenTripp

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This is one not to miss !!

I have no doubt at all this will be very special !!!

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On 17/04/2017 at 5:56 PM, Martykt said:

This is one not to miss !!

I have no doubt at all this will be very special !!!

 

It no doubt still will be but due to circumstances beyond anyone's control they'll be no turntable.

 

The rest of the system will be there and apparently digital recordings made using the turntable.

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28 minutes ago, KenTripp said:

 

It no doubt still will be but due to circumstances beyond anyone's control they'll be no turntable.

 

The rest of the system will be there and apparently digital recordings made using the turntable.

 

That is unfortunate.

I hope Mark will be back with his Turntable very soon, it is very good and well worth hearing.

 

Still I'm very much looking forward to hearing the Thrax gear, hopefully should be a great night.

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Blyme!   Glad i read this before i turned up else i would have thrown up on the spot.  Big disappointment for a turntable night not to have the turntable. 

Still mark is so awesome just hearing his talk will be well worth it. 

P.

 

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      Melway Map 48 Ref G9
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    • By KenTripp
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    • By drdarkfish
      Hi All,

      Further to my post last week, here is some feedback I want to share regarding my new Turntable Rig. I say “Rig” because I changed my turntable, arm and cartridge all in one large 'switch-out'.


      New Rig Details

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      ·         Arm: Kuzma 4Point – 11”

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      Rest of the System

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      Why change?
      Previously I was using a VPI Classic One (the first iteration), standard VPI 10" uni-pivot arm, external string motor by Scheu Analog and a Lyra Delos moving Coil Cartridge. This was a great setup, I had never had such a dynamic, balanced sound. It was also my first experience with a uni-pivot arm and I was very impressed, I heard little uni-pivot 'chatter' that people often speak of. I used the external String Motor by Scheu Analog (soon to be sold on SNA) because I felt that the motor in the VPI plinth was a little too loud (vibrations through bearing) and tended to smear edges. The external motor was a huge improvement.

      Did I need to upgrade my setup? Absolutely not.

      Everything about my previous combo was awesome, I was sufficiently far enough up the 'law of diminishing returns curve’ that it would have kept me happy for years.


      However, my Lyra Delos was coming to about the mid-point of it’s useful life and I reached a fork in the road. I was so utterly impressed by the Delos (my first Lyra cart) that It started the cogs turning about an upgrade.  The thing that kept bugging me is: how is it possible that the Delos is only the entry model for Lyra?


      In the end, I upgraded because of pathological curiosity. What does that incremental 10% “better” sound like (albeit at 3x the cost). Note: The outlay for this upgrade was considerable and by no means within normal expenditure for me – some people have a passion for cars, mine is vinyl. Upgrading to the Lyra Etna SL meant an upgrade in everything (the car needed to match the engine and so forth). So in reality it’s really the Lyra Etna that drove the entire upgrade.


      Preface
      I will not make comparisons between my setups because its normally not useful for others and is usually accompanied with too many asterixis, despites, howevers, keep-in-minds… Besides, the minds-ear has bad tricks it plays on your memory (and visa versa), without a direct A/B under perfect conditions any comparison is fairly useless.


      I will also not comment on ‘build-quality’ other than to say the components are as good as you would hope.

      It took a good month in order to get everything setup correctly. This probably would have been quicker but I was getting used to a new arm and turntable. The Lyra design is fairly congruent across the range, so there were no big differences in the geometry between the Delos and Etna (other than the strange asymmetric design – slightly off-putting at first).


      Tracking

      The Etna + 4Point combo tracks exceedingly well. Through difficult passages of music it never seems congested or ‘strained’. Everything is retained in a cohesive image, with no harsh/distorted elements. The impressive thing about the Etna is that it retains its ‘character’ under any conditions (more about character below) – that is to say there is no discernible changes in its ‘response’ with difficult tracking. Some cartridges can sound thin or bloated in complex passages (even good ones), the Etna appears not to.


      On the Hi-fi News Test Record I managed to pass all torture tests except the very last (though this doesn’t mean much).


      For fun, I pulled out my copy of the 1812 Overture pressed by Telarc – the one with REAL(!) canons. The combo breezed through the canon sections like a hot knife through butter. Interestingly, this is the first time I had been able to clearly discern other instruments at the point of explosion when the canons hit (/shortly thereafter). Normally (at least in my experience) the cartridge/arm is so occupied wrangling the 6hz tone modulation that everything else tends to go out the window.


      (Note: those who are thinking of getting a copy of the 1812 Overture by Telarc, I highly recommend doing your research before playing, this vinyl is potentially damaging to your system - I DO NOT play it often, it’s a once-a-year party trick).


      Sonic Character (the really subjective part)

      I will speak of the sonic character of the Etna as a proxy for the entire Rig, this is because I think the job of the Arm and TT is to interfere as little as possible in the sound-reproduction process. (that is not to say the individual elements don’t have a Character – of course they do, but you need to start somewhere).


      If I had to pick one word to describe the sound of the Etna it would be “Solid”. It may sound simplistic but after 2 months of listening, that is the one word that I keep coming back to. The mid-range is dense.


      The Etna has an unwavering solidity that has the effect of sounding like tape. I think this partially relates to how well it tracks: because there is low tracking errors, there is a higher consistency in the sound, and therefore you hear less “vinyl” and more music. I’ve often heard Michael Fremer say that good vinyl systems sound like ‘tape’ and I’m starting to understand more what that means.


      In terms of frequency response, the Etna does not appear to exaggerate anything. Highs are open, airy and fast (like all Lyra carts), without sounding bright. The bass extends low (very low) and is well defined, without being bloated – all ticks here. But you’d expect that from this kind of product.


      What the Etna doesn’t do is make average records sound better (some carts do that but at the expense to too many other elements). What it also doesn’t do (which many high-end cartridges fail at miserably) is that it doesn’t make them sound worse (important if you like listening to music….). You can read many reviews of the Etna where the reviewer states “it just makes you want to listen to more vinyl” - and I couldn’t agree with that statement more.


      However (and this is the exciting part), when you play a truly well mastered and pressed vinyl, hold onto your pants because this is where the Etna really shines. The Etna is so utterly impressive with dynamic slam, even-handed response, solid mid-range, it is out-of-this-world.

      Example One: Is a German press I own of Jimi Hendrix’s posthumous live compilation album ‘Hendrix In the West’: Listening to the iconic recording of Little Wing on Side-B is so utterly real, it left both myself and a friend speechless when we first listened. I’ve listened to this recording more times than I care to remember (mostly because it’s my favorite Hendrix song), when listening with the Etna you feel like your perched in the front row and you can hear everything from the skin of the drums to the buzz of the Marshall Stack 5meters away. Without sounding cheesy, it was like listening to it for the first time.


      Example Two: I picked up a copy of the newly re-released ‘LeGrand Jazz’ pressed by Impex Records (Bernie Grundman Mastering). There really is no ‘good place to start’ with this record, it contains some of the best musicians to ever live and is one of the best recordings I’ve ever heard. Listening to ‘Night in Tunisia’ and ‘Blue and Sentimental’ on SIDE-A is hands-down some of the best Jazz music (from both an audio+music perspective) I’ve heard. The dynamic swings in Night in Tunisia have a scary immediacy about them, in no way does this recording sound like 1958. If you want a good example of how things have potentially ‘gone backwards’ in terms of recording techniques, ‘Night in Tunisia’ is a good place to start. Shifting gears to ‘Blue and Sentimental’, a considerably more ‘laid back’ (“Blue”) track, the instruments have tangible timbre, so intimate you find yourself looking in the direction of the speaker to confirm it’s not right there in front of you!


      Summary

      As I said, this isn’t an upgrade I needed to make, nor was there much rationality in the decision-making process. Having said that, I’m sitting here 2 months later, considerably poorer but a very happy man.


      Sure, a 10% improvement is still only 10%, but I can say without hesitation that what this upgrade does to vinyl in my sound-cave is worth every penny.


      Buyer’s guilt = zero


      If you’re a little unhinged and/or looking at divorcing your partner, the Lyra is a good place to start. If you are single and/or have perfect mental health, don't shy away from giving it a go.




       
    • By KenTripp
      Avantgarde Acoustic Zero TA XD

      8pm Wednesday 19th July, visitors welcome.

      Willis Room, City of Whitehorse Offices
      Maroondah Highway (Whitehorse Road), Nunawading
      Melway Map 48 Ref G9
      Contact: 9437 1249
       
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      Employing Avantgarde's CDC technology, the midrange driver has no passive filter components in the signal path. This results in a sound characterized with an effortless clarity and explosive vitality. The 400 mm spherical midrange horn crosses over at 300hz to a DSP-controlled 10-band parametric subwoofer. This 12 inch long throw driver is powered by a 500Watt amplifier.
       
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      Wise and Wonderful Webmaster
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      http://www.melbourneaudioclub.org.au
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