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ummagumma

35A Bridge rectifier module - solder or terminal attach

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I need to replace a module type 35A ( or maybe 50A ) bridge rectifier in a salt chlorinator power unit. Old one is soldered.

A lot of heat was required to melt the solder on the old one due to the bulky cables used.

Just concerned about applying too much heat when re attaching.

Am wondering if it is advisable to use female spades or is soldering the only option?

Thanks

Steve

 

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There is a reason why they use solder as spades are unpredictable.   If it's like to go all the time you might wanna use spades as a last resort so it's easier to replace next time.   If you decided to use spades ensure that when you slip them on that it was a very tight connection.   I have seen it, but some spades now come with a spring lever contact in the centre.   So if the outer end of that female spade comes  loose resulting in a lose connection, the spring lever will take over.  

You will find that most international equipment are now either soldering on components or using screw in type terminals.  Spades loosening up is an absolute fire hazard especially for equipment that draws enourmous current. I've seen pcb go up in flames because of this when I was working on 3 phase power driving AC components that was built in the 70-80. 

 

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25 minutes ago, ummagumma said:

 

I need to replace a module type 35A ( or maybe 50A ) bridge rectifier in a salt chlorinator power unit. Old one is soldered.

A lot of heat was required to melt the solder on the old one due to the bulky cables used.

Just concerned about applying too much heat when re attaching.

Am wondering if it is advisable to use female spades or is soldering the only option?

Thanks

Steve

 

 

 

I have some experience with these things. First off: Remove the bridge from the heat sink. Next:

 

* Use a soldering iron with a really big tip and run it hot. 

* Solder quickly. 

* Use the biggest (highest current) bridge you can locate.

* Use thermal compound to mount the new bridge securely to the heat sink. 

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Thanks..was thinking that soldering  was used for a reason in the original design.

Replacing original with Solid State 50A original was 35A.

Appreciate the advice.

Steve

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A number of my amplifiers use crimped connectors to the rectifiers with a 700vdc rated crimp insulator sleeve. The rectifiers are 50amps. Crimped connectors are easier for troubleshooting they still require a good bit of force to remove from the rectifier legs. 

 

Cheers,

Edited by willio747

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Thanks. Did Solder successfully.

Followed advice above.

Took a lot of heat but all worked afterwards.

Will think about crimping for next time :)

Probably with a quality crimping tool...

Thanks again.

Edited by ummagumma

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