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Grizzly

Analogue/Digital sound levels

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I have noticed in my Cambridge AVR that the analogue inputs appear to have a far greater gain than using a digital input (which I only use from DVD). So to get the same level of sound I need to have it cranked quite a bit higher when using DVD as opposed to other sources. Is this normal or is it possibly an issue that needs addressing?

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I have a similar problem Bear. I'm just too slack to find the time to sort it all out. ;)

Check with the DVD player to see if there is a volume adjustment or any dynamic (night time) compression on.

Also your AVR may have input level adjustments in the setup somewhere so you can balance out the input levels.

Baring that, wait for some experts to answer - I'm just guessing.:D

NFA

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AH good thinkin Phantom Comic- I'll check it out thanks!

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Your average DVD is more dynamic than your average CD (loudness war) which is why movies seem quieter.

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Your average DVD is more dynamic than your average CD (loudness war) which is why movies seem quieter.

Yup, Cd's are heavily compressed (especially the pop ones) to the point where it sounds crappy.

Clasical cds on the other hand have great dynamic range.

I listen to modern/contemporary jazz. My Cds are made in Japan, Usa or Germany. Sounds fantastic. Listen to a pop CD? Awefull!! :cool:

Rgds

Pat

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ya, this is pretty normal. I have no rule of thumb for volume as it also depends on how the media was recorded. Some CD's and the likes are often just recorded a bit hot imo.

If it bother you look for adjustments in the DVD player as already suggested, if the settings are all ok it may have sep trim adjustments you could use to tweak it a lil.

simple solution is just turn up da volume when watching a movie though. I've been known for going as much as -15 for some movies (above reference level on my system) but this often means I get a visit from the boys in blue lol.

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I've noticed a similar thing with my Marantz AVR. However, it seems to quite variable depending on the digital source being used. Dolby Digital and DTS sources often require higher volume settings.

I don't use the AVR for playing CDs though. For that, I use a DacMagic playing through a stereo amp. I can't say I've noticed the same level of difference in this case when comparing analog to digital through the same amp.

And, yeah, sure, some CDs are heavily compressed and sound awful, but many are not and sound great.

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Not sure if the AVR is the same as their 2 channel kit, but on the 840E preamp you can adjust the gain per input so they are at similar levels. Here is a bit from the manual. (Looks like you should turn the louder ones down, rather than the quieter ones up. Guess this may produce less distortion or other unwanted issues)

Input gain trim



The relative levels of the inputs can be adjusted by gain trim. This allows

each to be adjusted so that each sounds the same in terms of average

loudness when you switch between them. Pick the loudest sounding

source and trim its level until it matches the average perceived level of

the others. Repeat this process if other sources also stand out as louder

than the average.

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Your amp doesn't have a different gain, there is simply a difference in the outputs from the internal DACs vs the analogue input sensitivity or the input level applied to the analogue inputs.

Trying to "match" levels between analogue and digital inputs is a problem that plagues most users. Some amplifiers have scalable inputs which the user can adjust sentitivity with, either on the analogue ot digital inputs. Unfortunately this feature a generally only equipped to a few expensive models. As your analogue inputs are too loud compared to the digital ones, you can simply and inexpensively attenuate them with a resistive divider networks. All you will need is a soldering iron, simple hand tools, a selection of resistors and some RCA sockets and plugs. :D

Cheers,

Alan R.

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