Jump to content

New Wheels suggestions


Recommended Posts

I've been doing some research on upgrading my Trek Domane stock wheels. Leaning towards Shimano Dura Ace c24 also have read some great reviews on TWE wheels. My weight is currently 75kg there seems to be climbing wheels and aero more leaning towards lighter set of wheels.  Curious  what wheel upgrades others have gone for. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a sucker for bespoke and either 25mm or 28mm tyres

Craftworx in Brissie (northside) do excellent work
=>>> http://craftworx.com.au/craftworx-works ... pairs.html

had a pair of DT Swiss RR440 trued by Steve after another wheel builder couldn't get the rear correct and spoke broke after 1500kms on a bullet proof 32 spoke build

also have a pair of Archetypes that Steve built new for me on my older Campag hubs - bl**dy beautiful wheels and build, straight as, rides so quietly and likely outlast me

no association, but excellent workmanship and pricing and will give you the right advice and get you a superb set of wheels

 

my builds are all 32 spoke 3*, whereas you're a bit lighter than me so I guess 28 spoke may well be fine

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites


1 hour ago, alittlewino said:

I'm a sucker for bespoke and either 25mm or 28mm tyres

Craftworx in Brissie (northside) do excellent work
=>>> http://craftworx.com.au/craftworx-works ... pairs.html

had a pair of DT Swiss RR440 trued by Steve after another wheel builder couldn't get the rear correct and spoke broke after 1500kms on a bullet proof 32 spoke build

also have a pair of Archetypes that Steve built new for me on my older Campag hubs - bl**dy beautiful wheels and build, straight as, rides so quietly and likely outlast me

no association, but excellent workmanship and pricing and will give you the right advice and get you a superb set of wheels

 

my builds are all 32 spoke 3*, whereas you're a bit lighter than me so I guess 28 spoke may well be fine

 

Will check them out thanks for the feedback. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of friends have raved about mavic cosmic carbone for a fast aero and strong wheel. I'm cheap and use campy zondas (shimano hub) and campy neutrons. I got the zondas from wiggle for less than $500. I've had 32spoke velocity aerohead with white industries hubs, and ultegra on mavic open pro rims, but prefer the factory built campy wheels. The campy wheels roll really well and have stayed truer longer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Campy zondas get some great reviews, actually this morning was chatting with one the guys. He does triathlons on his every day bike has zondas. Loves them  he averages 600kms weekly. Seems the less weight more you pay in the end your probably saving 100 to 200 grams. which I'm sure once summer hits I will loose another kilo. 

Link to post
Share on other sites


I feel I can comment here as I have 2 sets of Greg's TWE wheels and a set of Dura-Ace C24. Both are very, very good wheels. Lightweight, strong enough to have no problems with my roughly 83 kg weight and high distance riding. I do more kms on the Lynskey with the Dura-Ace wheels as the one thing that swings me to them over the TWE is they are one of the few wheels still available with easily maintainable hubs as you can remove, clean, regrease and replace the bearings rather than having to push out and replace with new a sealed bearing. If you ride a lot when it rains (as I do) then this can be a real selling point.

 

If push came to shove I would choose the Shimano over the basic TWEs. Both are very good though.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It will make more difference to your riding if you stop eating chocolate for couple of weeks and drop a kilo or two, than 300g that you will save on the wheels. It is also much cheaper option as well. :sorry:;) 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hergest said:

I feel I can comment here as I have 2 sets of Greg's TWE wheels and a set of Dura-Ace C24. Both are very, very good wheels. Lightweight, strong enough to have no problems with my roughly 83 kg weight and high distance riding. I do more kms on the Lynskey with the Dura-Ace wheels as the one thing that swings me to them over the TWE is they are one of the few wheels still available with easily maintainable hubs as you can remove, clean, regrease and replace the bearings rather than having to push out and replace with new a sealed bearing. If you ride a lot when it rains (as I do) then this can be a real selling point.

 

If push came to shove I would choose the Shimano over the basic TWEs. Both are very good though.

Shimano dura ace 24 can get a set from cycling express for $935 would have to be high on my list. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

@buzz lightyear

 

to throw a shameless spanner in the works, have a set of 2014 Campag Zondas basically new - told they were literally ridden for 100m and they're still wrapped up

 

I won't use these as became absolutely sold on the pre 2006 large axle Campag hubs (with the loose bearings so easy servicing) and bespoke build

 

note Fulcrum make a hub to convert a Campag axle to Shimano cassettes - have done this on both of my bespoke wheel builds easy peasy and can point you to the right part if interested

 

pm me if interested as will be less $ -  absolutely fine of you're not as DA 24s get good wraps

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites


I would not buy the c24's if you do a lot of descending or riding in bad weather where braking is required, say commuting. They have very thin side walls and if you ride a lot you may struggle to get 7000km's out of a set. My wife has a set which I also used before going disc brakes.

 

I'd suggest Hed Ardennes wheels (custom or off the peg) if wanting a nice light wheel that rides beautifully and gives amazing cornering grip. They were the best all rounder I've had, including Zipp 101's, Zipp 404 tubulars (racing only), Easton SL90's, etc etc. My disc bike now has Roval carbon clinchers but the HED Ardennes were still a nicer rolling wheel. If given the choice these days I'd want at least a 23mm width rim, they just roll so well and corner like on rails.

 

If interested I have a near new, custom built rear Ardennes (Silver Chris King hub) and the matching front hub if you wanted to get a rim laced onto it. There were built by Pro wheel builder USA with Sapim aero spokes. I wrote off the original front rim and spokes by driving into the garage. That's when i went to Disc brakes with the insurance money as the frame also cracked where the bike carrier held the downtube, only a minor knock too. I paid $1300ish when the dollar was better than today. Happy to get $500 for rear wheel and front hub including a 10spd Sram cassette. The hub will also take 11 spd if go that way at a later date.

 

like these but I suspect with much better spokes

http://www.probikekit.com.au/bicycle-wheels/chris-king-r45-with-hed-ardennes-wheelset/10782901.html

Edited by blybo
better link
Link to post
Share on other sites


I've got 12,000 kms out of my C24s so far riding in some really shitehouse weather and am a heavy brake user and wear through Shimano pads in no time at all so I'm surprised to read that comment about C24s as it doesn't reflect my experience.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Weight is not really an issue Pat, as stated earlier just loose a couple hundred ounces. You need to look at the hubs, rims and bearings. The Shimano have good robust long lasting hubs, but are not the best for rolling resistance.

Most known (brand) manufacturers produce good quality wheels that have both strength and weaknesses, but over all perform well for the average rider like us. I would suggest do your homework and buy a wheel set that fits into your criteria and price bracket. As you would be aware online stores are always having great specials on Shimano, Fulcrum, Compy , etc. Whatever you choose in your specific budget will do the job, and will have their strengths and weaknesses. Just take your time as the wheels don't make a hug difference, but the rider does.

 

Edited by handysteel
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Now on a serious side...I fully agree with the last post. Good quality cartridge bearings would make probably most of the difference in ride feeling and durability of the wheels. An obvious down side of carbon wheels is higher drag with a strong side wind. Zondas are awesome wheels BTW. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got my latest set of wheels this week, this time for the gravel bike.

Novatec hubs from Cycling Deal carrying Giant PCX2 rims from my Anthem held together with Sapim DB spokes, 32 in each. Made by Josh at XLR8 Wheels in Lennox Head. All up it was about $350 this time. This is the fourth wheelset he's made for me...only one more to go!

For general rim brake road wheels I'd go with the best hubs you can afford (I like White Industries hubs) but otherwise the Novatec hubs are very decent and very cheap.

Cycling Deal in Melbourne has a tonne of left over OE Novatec road hubs at the moment for almost pocket money. Get them properly laced up to something like the Hplusson Archetype rim and you'll be hard pressed to go wrong.

Failing that, I've a little used set of 2013 Fulcrum Quattro CX wheels that you could get for $200 posted

Personally, I have no doubt that Craftworx makes nice wheels but they are expensive for what they are...

Ours is not to reason why. Merely to point and giggle.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the offers gents but I'm the kind. Get the right set wheels once and no need to upgrade in the future. Got a quote from craftworx $800 with the current hubs. Will be giving him a call this morning well after my ride :) on a miserable Melbourne morning. 

image.jpg

image.jpg

image.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Are they his rebranded Novatec hubs with Japanese bearings? Or your old hubs with new bearings?

His Speed Plus wheels are the perfect road bike spec with the Archetypes and the Novatec hubs but about $300 over my pricing expectations. Should be $280 for the rims, $250 for the hubs and $250 for spokes and build...say $800 all up. Plus freight.

Ours is not to reason why. Merely to point and giggle.

Link to post
Share on other sites

my Archetype 32 spoke 3X DT Swiss build with me providing the large axle campag hubs only was around $370 - paid that in a heartbeat so didn't seem expensive at all to me - in fact to the contrary

 

but it was also convenient as he lives only 10km up the road

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I found that generally having wheels built, you always pay more. And the builders use stock manufactured parts anyway.  You don't always get a better wheel.

 

I prefer to use stock wheels that have been proven over time. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

really/ brand new expertly hand (not machine) made HPlusSon Archertypes 32 spoke 3* with NOS large axle Campag hubs to die for (admittedly took some searching but got them) cost me in total under $600

 

not being argumentative but it's horses for courses and I feel I got a very well priced set of excellent and unique wheels that will likely outlast me - and they ride beautifully for my needs

 

oh, RS80s get a good wrap and for good reason, but having to true a mass produced wheel at <1000kms did not please me at all

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As for the hub it's new on their line don't think it's on their web site yet. Dt Swiss spokes front 20 spoke straight pull, rear 24 spoke. With silver brass nipples also with the wheels skewers and kool stop brake pads. 

 

Built for my style riding and weight I suppose I am paying little extra. I suppose labor in Australia aint cheap and I'm a sucker for hand made here oz. And can be serviceable if I need too.

In the end a nice looking wheel set. 

Edited by buzz lightyear
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Ended up going with the H plus son Archtype wheel set. So far have manged to do 600kms on them. Love them noticed an instant improvement feels like a different bike perfect all round wheels. The guys at Craftworx where very helpful. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

it's a subtle thing, but I was amazed at the quietness of my wheels which I guess is to do with the quality of the components in synergy and a master builder getting even tensions and roundness

 

bit like vinyl vs digital, a difficult to put your finger on type of effect but one which I noticed half way around my first ride once I figured it out

 

and so it goes, every ride is a joy

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

+1 for Shimano Dura Ace c24 tubeless. I have spent far more and the c24 are still my favourite. The guys who build Dura Ace wheels are handpicked as the best wheelbuilders in the factory and only work on these wheels.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed my comment above about the brake track on my Dura Ace C24s above and coincidentally I replaced my rear wheel just this week as the brake track was worn. I got roughly 17,000 kms out of it so that's not bad. Rain never stops me riding so i've been out in some horrible stuff, if I only ever did dry weather riding I reckon I'd get another couple of thousand kms out of them.

 

I noticed when searching online for the new wheel that most places no longer had any stock of the 9000 Dura ace, it was all 9100 which were a hundred bucks or more expensive. I couldn't see what the difference if any was though but then I didn't research too heavily as once I'd found a 9000 stockist here in Oz (Bike Bug) I grabbed one.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...

Gonna do some research from this thread, thanks all, looking to replace the wheels on my Merida Speeder 100. In the meantime I might play with the originals and teach myself to tension spokes etc, might even build my own if it’s not too hard. Like 32 tyres, wheels and 700c, haven’t measured the hubs yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting to see my post about the Dura Ace 9000 and 9100 is now close to 3 years old, time doesn't half fly. 18 months ago I ended up getting some 9100 as the 9000 was no longer available anywhere. Still brilliant wheels and i'd have around 20,000 on my current set so no complaints from me. I'm letting the brake track wear more than I used to as it's fixed to the carbon fibre rather than an integral part of the wheel so my thoughts now are that I'll use them until the brake track wears to the point I can spot carbon fibre underneath rather than them just looking worn.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎9‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 6:13 PM, Hergest said:

Interesting to see my post about the Dura Ace 9000 and 9100 is now close to 3 years old, time doesn't half fly. 18 months ago I ended up getting some 9100 as the 9000 was no longer available anywhere. Still brilliant wheels and i'd have around 20,000 on my current set so no complaints from me. I'm letting the brake track wear more than I used to as it's fixed to the carbon fibre rather than an integral part of the wheel so my thoughts now are that I'll use them until the brake track wears to the point I can spot carbon fibre underneath rather than them just looking worn.

I need different wheels to you guys but I do agree that I prefer serviceable and greasable old school bearings etc.

 

Having said that, looks like I might go with some TWE wheels, TWE hubs, Campy rims and DT competition spokes. Price seems OK @ around $700 delivered.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...