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Found 19 results

  1. I posted this on the server thread but thought thought it deserved its own thread. IMO, it beats Daphile, Vortexbox , Audiophile Linux and others. And it can play J-river too ( licence needed).It may not work on all computers at this stage ( more development to come) but if it works on yours it is definitely worth trying. You can find out about it from here: http://www.snakeoil-os.net and download from here. Go to "iso" thread for links http://www.snakeoil-...BS/information/ Here is a screenshot from one of the setup pages.
  2. Item: Aurender X100L Music Server 8TB with Warranty until Jun 2018. The 8TB is the latest version (came after the 6TB/12TB) Location: Inner West Sydney Price: NO LONGER AVAILABLE Item Condition: As new (9.9/10) - plastic cover for screen still on there! I'm first owner. Reason for selling: Change in DAC. DAVE is less picky on source than the Metrum Pavane was. Payment Method: Pickup - Cash, Paypal, COD Only Extra Info: Will ship with all original double boxing/packaging, and purchase invoice for warranty purposes (bought new from Pymble Hi Fi in 2016). NO LONGER AVAILABLE Pictures:
  3. Item: sonicTransporter i7 (i7700 Kaby Lake) for Roon DSP - Roon Server - Roon Core - Music Server Location: Melbourne Price: $1500 with free shipping within Australia Item Condition: Excellent Reason for selling: No longer doing DSP so don't need so much power Payment Method: Pickup - Cash, Paypal, COD Only Extra Info: - This is the exact model and same specs: https://www.smallgreencomputer.com/collections/audio-server/products/sonictransporter-i7-for-roon-1-3-dsp?variant=35324041615 - With shipping this is around AU$2200 total - No internal hard drive - just add an external hard drive to one of the 4 x USB3.0 ports - This does Roon up-sampling to DSD512 with a processing rate of 2.5x (easily) - photo below Pictures:
  4. Item: QAT RS3 Music Server in Black or Silver Location: Tivoli Hi-Fi 155 Camberwell Road Hawthorn East VIC 3123 Price: $980 Including Freight anywhere in Australia Item Condition: Silver is new in box, black is ex display Payment Method: Direct Deposit, Paypal, Cash - Pickup in store, Credit Card including AMEX with no fees or penalties. PM Tivoli Hi-Fi staff member @jimsan after hours for prompt response. Extra Info: For those looking for a simple, high quality single room music server, the QAT sounds phenomenal, use either the single ended RCA outs or the balanced XLR. Can be used as a server only if you have an external DAC you love. If you plug in and external CD drive like a HP via the front USB the QAT software will rip your CD as a FLAC or WAV file and grab artwork and song metadata. This should be getting a lot more praise because we think it is a brilliant device. The RS3 Music Server is built with a high-performance processing circuit design, using custom-built chips, a high performance DAC and PCM format audio with a high sampling rate. Can handle everything up to 24-bit 192kHz. A mainstay of QAT music servers, RS3 has a 2.5 inch hard disk slot conveniently placed on the front panel, supporting both SSD and HDD disks, replacing a hard disk with another taking up only seconds. RS3 Music Server also allows connection of external devices through 3 USB ports and by way of wireless signal to network accessed storage (NAS), which gives nearly unlimited, additional storage. QAT has developed in-house an app ‘QAT’ to control the server to listen, rip and copy from anywhere with Wi-Fi signal. Our app comes both for iOS and Android devices, with tablets to control all functions, and phones for playback controls on iOS, on Android all functions are available on either devices. The apps are available for free on app store and the QAT website.
  5. Item: Aurender N100H Location: Sydney Price: Sold Item Condition: 9/10 Reason for selling: No longer used Payment Method: Pickup - Cash, Paypal, COD Only Extra Info: Purchased directly from Cam at Kirspy Audio in July 2015 for over $4K (currently retailing HERE for $4,299). I purchased two Aurender server's in July 2015 for the two systems I run: the N100H listed for sale here, and the X100L that will be listed for sale in a separate thread. The N100H comes with a 128GB SSD & 2TB of extra HDD storage, along with a linear power supply compared to the X100L's switch mode power supply. This particular N100H was in my main system and performed faultlessly for the close to a year and a half I ran it. In the spirit of full disclosure 2 months ago upon starting the unit up the usual cycle of start-up screens didn't take place as normal. Instead, the unit would simply light up (display a bank of pixels) without displaying any information. I contacted Aurender's support team via email and within 24 hours they'd fixed what ever was wrong remotely and the unit is now fully functional again. I'll offer an additional 6 month personal warranty on this component where should it not work as described I'll offer a full refund to the buyer of the unit. Some of the highlights of this unit include the aforementioned responsive and thorough support accessible by emailing the Aurender Team based out of Korea. The outstanding hardware implementation which you can read more about via the link above, and lastly the Aurender Media Manager (AMM) software, which if you prefer to access your music collection by browsing through a folder structure as opposed to tiles/album art, potentially goes toe to toe with Roon by way of user experience. Pictures:
  6. Item: Aurender X100L Location: Sydney Price: sold Item Condition: 9/10 Reason for selling: No longer used Payment Method: Pickup - Cash, Paypal, COD Only Extra Info: Purchased directly from hyper in July 2015, (12TB version currently retailing HERE for over $6K). Original for sale thread can be accessed via this LINK I purchased two Aurender server's in July 2015 for the two systems I run: the X100L listed for sale here, and the N100H listed for sale in a separate thread. The N100H comes with a 128GB SSD & 2TB of extra HDD storage, along with a linear power supply compared to the X100L's switch mode power supply & 6TB of storage. Some of the highlights of this unit include the aforementioned responsive and thorough support accessible by emailing the Aurender Team based out of Korea. The outstanding hardware implementation which you can read more about via the link above, and lastly the Aurender Media Manager (AMM) software, which if you prefer to access your music collection by browsing through a folder structure as opposed to tiles/album art, potentially goes toe to toe with Roon by way of user experience. Pictures:
  7. I've been running Plex Server from a small Zotac Z Box for some time and it's been flawless serving to Apple TVs around the house, along with iPads. I do want something with a little more power however. As I run a AV rack, I was thinking a 1U rack mount solution, but it's seems hard to find affordable i5 CPU rackmount PCs? Anyone have any ideas for a 1U rackmount computer with enough grunt (and quiet) for Plex Server?
  8. Snakeoil operating system is a new software for your music server that allows ...even the computer/linux illiterate (like me)...to easily switch between different players and kernels to find the combo that best suits your system and your tastes. What is a kernel? Don't know, don't care? That is the point; with Snakeoil you don't need to understand linux, kernels etc. You simply use your browser to change settings that affect sound quality. Does it sound great? Well yes, actually but that is the wrong question. Snakeoil is not just one system and it doesn't claim to be the best. It is all about letting you switch between different types of sound within moments and from the comfort of your listening position. You decide what is best for you. This thread is explicitly for: -People to share their experiences of which Snakeoil settings they like best -People seeking help in getting started or using Snakeoil. -Following Snakeoil updates i.e. Snakeoil only. To download or get help from the developer (Agent Kith) himself, visit http://www.snakeoil-os.net/ Please, please, if you want to talk about hardware, different software or your own computer genius, choose another thread. Consider the Snakeoil users that want a reference resource without pages of tangents to sift through. Thank you.
  9. Just stumbled across this device and wondered if anyone here is familiar with these or simply curious like me? Any reason why they wouldn't work as some kind of music player or server? http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1552&products_id=31584&utm_source=PCCG+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=edc3c9856d-fogii9_21_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_18f89722bc-edc3c9856d-22222505
  10. I have just read a very interesting post in the USB Regen topic by a member who is actually using one. I know some members own speakers and amps made by SGR. Have not heard much of the Music Kube here on SNA. Any views, reviews, feedback?
  11. I notice anytime they appear for sale people always crack jokes about how long they will last till someone purchases them and rightfully so since they seem to sell within an hour. Not sure what the fuss is about since it seems to do the same thing that an Android phone/tablet can do with BubbleUPnP installed https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bubblesoft.android.bubbleupnp&hl=en. Is there something i'm missing about this device that makes them so popular?.
  12. Looking for input from people who have compared the sound quality from different dedicated music servers/streamers/renderers... ...and people willing to participate in GTGs for future comparisons. In particular, this is for people that don't want to tweak a PC or Mac; would rather buy a solution from the likes of Antipodes, Aria, Auralic, Auraliti, Aurender, Ayon...just to mention a few starting with "A". A few of us kinda hijacked a thread from a guy asking advice http://www.stereo.net.au/forums/index.php?/topic/77785-setting-up-a-digital-front-end-without-a-cd-player-some-advice-please/ ...so moving the conversation here. Cheers, JD
  13. Hi all, I like to start a thread where we can discuss our findings with centralized media and playback to multiple devices around the house. I would like to avoid any discussion about playback from a storage device through the internal media application on a particular device. What I would like to see working is a stable media network around the house with a multitude of attached network devices, a central media server and 1 controller app for all of it. For Example in my case. Media Server(s): JRiver Media Center: XBMC; Plex Media Server Media Player(s): Oppo BDP-105; Sony BDP-S5100 Sonos Playbar Android Tablet Media Controller(s) (Android): Gizmo for JRiver Eos for JRiver XBMC Media Center Yatse XBMC Remote Plex media App Sonos App MediaHouse Bubble UPnP All the above media servers work in my network and provide the content to any player or controller and this seems to be the most easy part of the Media Automation. JRiver doesn't always show up as an available server and is not the most stable. All the above network players work in my network but all have their limitations. The ability to playback a certain file lies within the hardware of the device and is impossible to change yourself. Sonos Playbar doesn't see any media server except for XBMC. Doesn't always show up in the play to device list Sony BDP-S5100 crashes with BD rips in MKV format, it doesn't output Dolby True HD over the network, it doesn't play all common formats. Oppo BDP-105 has problems with subtitles over the network, doesn't always show up in the play to device list The hardest part and the cherry on the cake is the Media Controller Application. From the above list Bubble UPnP is the most reliable in finding all available Media Servers and Media Players. But it doesn't have a nice graphical interface. The graphical interface is highly dependent on what Web Interface the server software is providing, and is thus Server dependent. Plex and Yatse have by far the most elegant and complete user interface of them all. Plex however only work with Plex media players. Sonos has the best app with integrated third party applications like streaming radio, but only plays to other Sonos devices and only does music. Gizmo and Eos are not the most stable applications but have a lot of potential. In other words; Some are good with video material while others are good with music. Some of them have a very nice graphical user interface and or work with every device or server while others don't. Some are more stable than the others. But all in all the best I can get out of it at the moment is 75%. What do you use around the house and is working or not working for you?
  14. Since Logitech's discontinuance of the Squeezebox family of network music players the Squeezebox user community has made great strides in leveraging an alternative hardware platform to fulfill the role of a Squeezebox transport. In a nutshell this means that if you're looking to leverage Logitchemediaserver and the great controller apps that exist for Android and iOS (SqueezeCommander/ OrangeSqueeze and iPeng) as your digital playback backbone you're in luck. The community has built a ready-made Linux distribution called CSOS that can be installed on a Wandboard and turns it into a Squeezebox transport and/or server for Logitechmediaserver's purposes. You can then output the digital stream from the Wandboard to your DAC using its asynchronous USB input. Whilst CSOS is based on Fedora and does all that's required, I prefer to roll my own using Arch Linux - the principle reason being that Arch Linux is a pretty lean OS, meaning its less resource intensive and runs noticeably faster than CSOS. The downside is you need to put in the effort to "roll your own" so to speak. You can configure the Wandboard to simply act as a transport or alternatively you can configure the Wandboard as a standalone Logitechmediaserver and Squeezebox transport. To turn the Wandboard into a Squeezebox transport and/or player both CSOS and this RYO solution leverage an application called Squeezelite. I'm going to post the guide in parts to deal with different aspects of rolling your own transport/server so please bear with me because some of it is a work in progress. There's enough in the first post to turn a Wandboard into a fully functional Squeezebox transport. What you'll need: - Wandboard Dual or Quad - 8GB micro SD card -- get as quick a card as you can as its speed affects bootup time and load time of anything not in RAM. - Micro SD card reader/ writer to write the OS image to your micro SD card - if you want to configure your Wandboard from your regular PC / Laptop you'll need to connect the Wandboard to your home network - a SSH client to login to the Wandboard from your desktop/laptop. If using Linux, use ssh. If Windows, install and use putty - a DAC that has an asynchronous USB input Installation: The first thing you need to do is install Arch Linux to a micro SD card (8GB minimum). I highly recommend that you ensure the microSD is high-speed. To prepare the microSD and install Arch Linux CLICK HERE then click on the installation tab and follow the instructions. Before rebooting your Wandboard, connect it to your home network and your ADSL Router's DHCP (or whatever DHCP server you're using) will assign the Wandboard an IP on reboot. When you're done with that you have a working Arch Linux install on your Wandboard. All that remains now is updating OS components, customising a few things and finally installing and configuring Squeezelite and optionally Logitechmediaserver (should you want to use your Wandboard as a standlone player with HDD attached). Determine the Wandboard's IP using your DHCP server or use nmap if running *nix (replace 192.168.168 with the subnet you're using): nmap -sP 192.168.168.0/24 The Wandboard is the device named 'alarm'. Login using SSH [username = root; password = root] (Windows users use putty): ssh root@wandboardIP Update OS, change hostname and install audio components: pacman -Syu hostnamectl set-hostname SqueezeWand pacman -Sy faad2 libmad mpg123 libao alsa-utils avahi wget Configure alsa - asound.conf file: nano /etc/asound.conf Paste in the following: pcm.!default { type plug slave.pcm "softvol" } pcm.dmixer { type dmix ipc_key 1024 slave { pcm "hw:0" period_time 0 period_size 4096 buffer_size 131072 rate 41100 } bindings { 0 0 1 1 } } pcm.dsnooper { type dsnoop ipc_key 1024 slave { pcm "hw:0" channels 2 period_time 0 period_size 4096 buffer_size 131072 rate 41100 } bindings { 0 0 1 1 } } pcm.softvol { type softvol slave { pcm "dmixer" } control { name "Master" card 0 } } ctl.!default { type hw card 0 } ctl.softvol { type hw card 0 } ctl.dmixer { type hw card 0 } Install Squeezelite: mkdir -p /usr/local/bin cd /usr/local/bin wget -O squeezelite http://squeezelite-downloads.googlecode.com/git/squeezelite-armv6hf chmod a+x squeezelite Configure Arch to fire up Squeezelite on startup: nano /etc/systemd/system/squeezelite.service Paste in the following: [Unit] Description=Squeezelite lightweight headless squeezebox emulator After=sound.target Requires=avahi-daemon.service After=network.target After=avahi-daemon.service [Service] ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/squeezelite -n SqueezeWand Restart=always [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target Configure Arch to autostart squeezelite and avahi-daemon on boot: systemctl enable squeezelite avahi-daemon Connect the Wandboard to your DAC using a suitably insulated USB cable and ensure your DAC is powered up. Now reboot: reboot Following reboot your Logitechmediaserver should have a SqueezeWand entry in its players list (refresh your LMS browser window if necessary). All that remains now is to obtain your DAC string from Squeezelite, add it to the startup configuration and you're in business. Login using SSH [username = root; password = root] (Windows users use putty): ssh root@wandboardIP Have squeezelite list output devices: squeezelite -l You'll see a listing along the lines of the following (specifics will change based on the capabilities of your asynchronous USB DAC): Output devices: null - Discard all samples (playback) or generate zero samples (capture) sysdefault:CARD=sgtl5000audio - sgtl5000-audio, - Default Audio Device sysdefault:CARD=imxspdif - imx-spdif, - Default Audio Device sysdefault:CARD=imxhdmisoc - imx-hdmi-soc, - Default Audio Device sysdefault:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD - Vivere384PCM-DSD, USB Audio - Default Audio Device front:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD,DEV=0 - Vivere384PCM-DSD, USB Audio - Front speakers surround40:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD,DEV=0 - Vivere384PCM-DSD, USB Audio - 4.0 Surround output to Front and Rear speakers surround41:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD,DEV=0 - Vivere384PCM-DSD, USB Audio - 4.1 Surround output to Front, Rear and Subwoofer speakers surround50:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD,DEV=0 - Vivere384PCM-DSD, USB Audio - 5.0 Surround output to Front, Center and Rear speakers surround51:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD,DEV=0 - Vivere384PCM-DSD, USB Audio - 5.1 Surround output to Front, Center, Rear and Subwoofer speakers surround71:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD,DEV=0 - Vivere384PCM-DSD, USB Audio - 7.1 Surround output to Front, Center, Side, Rear and Woofer speakers iec958:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD,DEV=0 - Vivere384PCM-DSD, USB Audio - IEC958 (S/PDIF) Digital Audio Output Identify your DAC from the abovementioned output and edit the startup command line to have Squeezelite stream to your DAC: nano /etc/systemd/system/squeezelite.service Change the line ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/squeezelite -n SqueezeWand to incorporate reference to your DAC and set the real time priority of the output thread at high priority: ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/squeezelite -n SqueezeWand -o hw:CARD=Vivere384PCMDSD,DEV=0 -p 1 Reboot for the last time and in a minute or so you should be good to start playing files via Logitechmediaserver using the Wandboard. reboot In time I'll include guidance re adding Logitechmediaserver to the install and using the Wandboard as a standalone music server and transport.
  15. I got an email a couple of days ago to notify me of the launch on iTunes Radio Apple’s online radio service has been US-only for quite a while now, People were beginning to lose hope that iTunes Radio would ever come to Australia & NZ Anyway I have been testing it out using IPad via Apple TV connected by optical cable to my DAC Works a treat I find it appealing to search an artist that is posted by a member in various threads e.g. Currently spinning Great for finding new music, great to play old favourites, great to find new artists Anyway more music to search and play - be back later Also good is a very simple interface View of main window View of search function and current stations
  16. Relisting item from yesterday as sale fell through. Item: Mac mini music server 2.3 MHz I& 4Gb Ram 1 TB hard drive + Apple USB Superdrive + Apple wireless mouse and Audirvana PLUS audio software Location: Canberra, ACT Price: $800 (over $1,200 in April 2013) Reason for selling: Trying a different front end Payment method: Paypal, direct transfer, cash pickup Additional information: This gear as basically unused as I bought to use as a headless music server with an iPad and never got a DAC for it. Original packaging and as new condition. Current model and you are getting a significant discount compared to new. Buyer pays postage.
  17. Item: Mac mini music server 2.3 MHz I& 4Gb Ram 1 TB hard drive + Apple USB Superdrive + Apple wireless mouse and Audirvana PLUS audio software Location: Canberra, ACT Price: $800 (over $1,200 in April 2013) Reason for selling: Trying a different front end Payment method: Paypal, direct transfer, cash pickup Additional information: This gear as basically unused as I bought to use as a headless music server with an iPad and never got a DAC for it. Original packaging and as new condition. Current model and you are getting a significant discount compared to new.
  18. Hello guys! Just thought this might be of interest to fellow DTV Forum readers - I recently decided to do a refresh of my Digital TV Tuner server, and it went so well, I did a write-up about it. I hope this helps anyone who might be interested in doing something similar. - Gough
  19. Initial preparation First off let me state that if you want to get the best performance out of Logitechmediaserver you should install *nix as an OS. LMS runs a hell of a lot faster under *nix than it does under any flavour of Windows I've ever tried it on - this is especially the case where library scans are concerned. This guide speaks to an Ubuntu installation. Download an Ubuntu Server ISO image (64 bit is preferred). Installing Ubuntu Server to a memory stick using a 2nd memory stick Secondly, let me cover some stuff that had me pulling out what little hair I have - installing Ubuntu from a memory stick to another memory stick on the Microserver (harder than it should be because the Microserver is idiosyncratic). To do this, remove/ disconnect all hard drives and USB devices (other than the USB stick you want to install from) from the Microserver, fire it up and make sure the BIOS is set to boot from the USB you have inserted. Save and exit the BIOS settings and let the Microserver start firing up the Ubuntu live session...whilst this is happening, insert the USB you want to install to into the motherboard USB header - it'll be visible to the Ubuntu live session and it'll be the only installation candidate available to you. Boot the Microserver from the memory stick and follow the installation prompts. Once you've gotten to this point let the installation run its course. Once it's completed, shut down the Microserver whilst removing the memory stick you booted and installed from. Install any hard drives you want in the Microserver. Power up the Microserver, once rebooted you can proceed to make your drives accessible by mounting them. If you want to mount your drives as discrete entities rather than create a RAID array do the following at the terminal prompt: sudo blkid This will return a listing of the drives installed in your Microserver. It will look something like this: /dev/sda1: UUID="5e917119-6a9b-441d-a714-a04655a8a4d8" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sdb1: UUID="de7f1768-950e-49ca-9034-d8b1d2231763" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sdc1: UUID="94038e76-5f89-42b9-99b2-51e3dc5cba2f" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sdd1: UUID="9334fa42-fed6-473f-aa39-cc03c03b6131" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sde1: UUID="d79f841a-d077-4668-9003-354658e724f2" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sdf1: UUID="36650a67-79b1-4fe7-9bb8-7c08c808964a" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sdf5: UUID="935ff3c3-90f8-4091-bb5d-1d3d09a5d99c" TYPE="swap" The UUID is the unique identifier for each drive/device and is the best method of ensuring specific drives are mounted to specific mountpoints (critical for using SBS/LMS on a memory stick and moving its data files to a hard drive which is pointed to via a symbolic link). As I don't use RAID (my collection's too large to give up a drive) I've got 5x hard drives (/dev/sda1...sde1) installed in my Microserver with each containing a single ext4 formatted partition. Make a directory within which to mount the drives and make it accessible to yourself: sudo mkdir /diskpool cd /diskpool sudo mkdir d1 d2 d3 d4 d5 sudo chown -R <yourusername>:<yourusername> /diskpool Now edit /etc/fstab to have Ubuntu Server mount your drives and to write log files to RAM rather than your USB stick: sudo nano /etc/fstab The file will look something like this: # /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a # device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices # that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5). # # <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass> # / was on /dev/sdb1 during installation UUID=36650a67-79b1-4fe7-9bb8-7c08c808964a / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1 # swap was on /dev/sdb5 during installation UUID=935ff3c3-90f8-4091-bb5d-1d3d09a5d99c none swap sw 0 0 Position the cursor on a new line and paste the following into the file (obviously substituting your own UUIDs): UUID=d79f841a-d077-4668-9003-354658e724f2 /diskpool/d1 ext4 user,noatime,noexec,nodev 0 0 UUID=de7f1768-950e-49ca-9034-d8b1d2231763 /diskpool/d2 ext4 user,noatime,noexec,nodev 0 0 UUID=5e917119-6a9b-441d-a714-a04655a8a4d8 /diskpool/d3 ext4 user,noatime,noexec,nodev 0 0 UUID=94038e76-5f89-42b9-99b2-51e3dc5cba2f /diskpool/d4 ext4 user,noatime,noexec,nodev 0 0 UUID=9334fa42-fed6-473f-aa39-cc03c03b6131 /diskpool/d5 ext4 user,noatime,noexec,nodev 0 0 # create temporary filesystems in RAM to extend the life of your USB stick tmpfs /tmp tmpfs defaults 0 0 tmpfs /var/log tmpfs defaults 0 0 tmpfs /var/tmp tmpfs defaults 0 0 Save the file and exit, then reprocess fstab to mount your drives: mount -a At this juncture I'm assuming you've a fully functional Ubuntu Server setup on your Microserver (which boots off a memory stick) and that you've mounted and can write to your hard drive(s). If you're booting from a hard drive then some of what follows is irrelevant to you. Caveat - Ubuntu Server 12.04 or later If you're installing Ubuntu Server 12.04 you may find that LMS doesn't start up (as I did). Do this before attempting to install LMS: sudo apt-get install libgd-gd2-perl Installing LMS First off you need to add the LMS repositories to Ubuntu server. In a terminal window enter the following: sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list followed by your user password when prompted. Now add one of the following lines to the bottom of the file (stable is an official release, testing implies testing releases): # Squeezebox deb http://debian.slimdevices.com stable main OR # Squeezebox deb http://debian.slimdevices.com testing main Save your changes and exit. Now type the following in the terminal window: sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install logitechmediaserver It may take a while for LMS to be downloaded and installed. When the install is completed LMS will automatically be started. This represents a problem if you're running the OS on a memory stick because LMS is going to build its database on the memory stick (not a good idea from a performance perspective, if you have a large collection, or make changes to tags on a regular basis). To have LMS write its database to an alternative location on a hard drive stop LMS, move its data files to the location of your choice and create a symbolic link to the new destination using the following: sudo service logitechmediaserver stop Move the contents of /var/lib/squeezeboxserver/cache to the drive and folder in which you wish to house LMS' database. I find it easiest to do this using Midnight Commander Now remove the folder /var/lib/squeezeboxserver/cache and replace it with a symbolic link to the folder you moved the contents to. sudo rm -R /var/lib/squeezeboxserver/cache && sudo ln -s /path/to/target/dir /var/lib/squeezeboxserver/cache Change ownership of the symbolic link to your target directory from the "root" user to the "squeezeboxserver" user: sudo chown -R squeezeboxserver:nogroup /var/lib/squeezeboxserver/cache Finally restart LMS sudo service logitechmediaserver start That's it, now you can go ahead and configure LMS and scan your library (I suggest that the first thing you do is tell LMS that your library and playlists are located in /tmp whilst you're configuring LMS - this avoids it triggering a scan of your library until you've set it up to run the way you like - the last step should be pointing it to your actual library for the real scan to initiate). When you're done configuring LMS point it to /diskpool to scan your entire library. If you're running a Windows desktop and you want to be able to add/delete/move audio files on the Microserver using your Windows desktop you need to install and configure SAMBA to make the Microserver visible on your Windows network: sudo nano /etc/samba/smb.conf Position the cursor at the end of the file and add the following lines: [audiolib0] path = /diskpool available = yes valid users = x read only = no browsable = yes public = yes writable = yes You can change "audiolib0" above to something else - it's basically the name that will appear in your Windows network neighbourhood Now restart SAMBA: sudo service smbd restart
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