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pc9

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  1. Samsung are significantly downgrading its 4Q QLED range in 2020 attempting to push consumers into the premium 8K market, so I suggest you purchase the 2019 Q75R at that price. Exhibit A 2019 Q75R Full array local dimming with 40 zones 2020 Q70T Edge lit panel with no local dimming.
  2. If picture quality is important to you then avoid TVs with an IPS panel such as the LG M86OO or 7600 or any lower end Sony models. IPS panels are terrible for contrast and black levels. IPS panels, to be fair, will provide a wider viewing angle than TVs with a VA panel so if your lounge configuration includes a wide seating arrangement, then an IPS unit may suit you. The Sony X8000G in the 75" version utilises a VA panel (the smaller sizes come with an IPS panel), however it is an edge lit TV so will be limited in its ability to display HDR material as intended by the director. Suggest you purchase the 65" Sony 950G which is a full array local dimming TV utilising a VA panel that will give you a much more "immersive" experience with movies. I would also look at the Samsung Q70R which is also a quality full array local dimming television. I believe it is currently on special at JBs for about $2300. Hope this helps.
  3. Q90R (2019) 480 dimming zones Q9 (2020) 96 dimming zones Q80R (2019) 86 dimming zones Q8 (2020) 46 dimming zones Q70R (2019) 40 dimming zones Q7 (2020) edge lit with no local dimming Looks like a downgrade to me, although if they use a decent local dimming algorithm on the Q8 & 9 models (as per the 2018 Q8FN) they may bet away with a comparable PQ result.
  4. Samsung's 8K TVs look great if you can afford it. I note, with great disappointment that they are "scaling down" their 4K series in 2020. For example, the Q7 is apparently returning to an edge lit display and the Q8 and Q9 will contain much fewer dimming zones than the current years models. Although no official news has been released on the 2020 models, its look as though if you want a premium Samsung panel this year, you will be forced to pay the extra bucks for an 8K TV. Just so glad that I purchased the legendary Q8FN in 2018 It looks like finally, after several years of low spec. models, Hisense will be introducing their higher end full array panels into Australia in 2020 including dual layer LCD. If this is the case, then for the first time Australian consumers will have a budget option with advanced features in the LCD/LED market. Bring it on.
  5. Plenty of 950Gs in Australia. JB currently has the 65" version for $2400. Nice FALD set with a VA panel. You can't go wrong at this price. An excellent choice. All Samsung TVs use a VA (vertically aligned) panel. The Q75 has full array local dimming. I expect the 82" version will have about 100 zones.
  6. An excellent choice. All Samsung TVs use a VA (vertically aligned) panel. The Q75 has full array local dimming. I expect the 82" version will have about 100 zones.
  7. Just be a bit careful here. The magic words are full array local dimming (FALD). Some manufacturers such as HISENSE will try to bamboozle customers with terms such as "200 local dimming zones" but this refers to pseudo local dimming where an algorithm is used to create zones in an edge lit panel. I've probably confused you a bit more but if you are talking to a sales person just insist on seeing panels with full array local dimming. FALD tvs are usually distinguished by a thicker panel (and a higher price tag!) Follow Pete_macs advice above and you can't go wrong. Rule of thumb - avoid contrast poor IPS panels (LG) and go full array local dimming (FALD) if you can afford to. If you have to go edge lit due to budget constraints then the Samsung RU 8000 may be a good buy. Decent contrast and brightness despite the lack of local dimming. Happy hunting.
  8. Follow Pete_macs advice above and you can't go wrong. Rule of thumb - avoid contrast poor IPS panels (LG) and go full array local dimming (FALD) if you can afford to. If you have to go edge lit due to budget constraints then the Samsung RU 8000 may be a good buy. Decent contrast and brightness despite the lack of local dimming. Happy hunting.
  9. In 2017 and again in 2018, Samsung promised to upgrade the KS 8000 TV to HDR 10+; but it never happened. Its a shame because HDR 10+ on Prime Video titles, really pop on my Samsung Q8FN, whereas the same shows on the KS 8000 have no where near the same amount of immersion. The manufacturers want consumers to buy the latest models; they do this by de-optimising TVs purchased a couple of years prior through firmware upgrades that reduce black levels and by not providing the latest features such as HDR 10+. This has been going on for several years and...………….it really sucks.
  10. Just a further comment - the smaller sizes in the Sony 8500G will likely utilise an IPS panel. IPS panel technology is very good if a wide viewing angle is a priority due to seating arrangements. But this comes with a significant drop in contrast. I purchased an LG LCD TV with an IPS panel several years ago and it was hopeless in dark scenes, particularly with movies. If wide angle viewing is a priority then go with an IPS panel, however if this is not an issue, then avoid LG, Panasonic and lower end Sony LCD televisions. Samsung, Hisense, TCL and high end Sony and Panasonic LCD LEDs use VA panels which produce superior contrast with poor viewing angles. Swings and roundabouts but its VA panels for me every time.
  11. The step up is Full Array Local Dimming (FALD). Definitely worth it IMHO, especially for screen sizes above 65" when watching movies. FALD combined with the wider colour gamut and greater peak brightness of the higher end models will give HDR movies greater pop and is better for watching in a dark room. The Sony 9500G and the Samsung Q75R have a limited number of dimming zones but very good local dimming algorithms. If you are not so much of a movie buff and just watch general TV, sports etc then go with the edge lit 8500G or Q60R. Screen uniformity, contrast and brightness will still be pretty decent on these models. Happy hunting.
  12. Recommended retail prices on Sharp and Samsung 52" LCDs in 2006 were about $10k.
  13. I would be surprised if any of TCLs advanced tech. TVs come to Australia. As far as the company is concerned we are bracketed with the Asian region which pretty much limits the LCD range to the cheaper edge lit models. The TCL series 6 range with FALD has been available in the US for several years but is yet to be seen on our shores. Hisense appear to be adopting a similar approach with the "ball breaking" series 9 model (including a host of advanced features) just released in the US, but not coming to Australia any time soon.
  14. Purchasing an LCD/LED always involves a "panel lottery" in terms of quality control so its great that you have obtained a good panel. To be fair, most of the well known reviewers are paid up members of the "OLED fan boy club" so whenever a high end LCD comes along that makes an impact, they move very quickly to find fault with it. My Q8FN is not without some issues (minor DSE, screen uniformity etc) but I wouldn't be without it. Bloody brilliant colour, brightness, contrast, black levels and excellent local dimming system.
  15. Lower end LCD TVs have come along way in the past few years - even at larger sizes such as 75". I own a Samsung Q8FN which is a higher end model from 2018. I also own a Samsung MU7000 75" TV from 2017 and whilst the Q8FN is the overall better unit, mainly due to the full array local dimming, in some respects the MU7000 outperforms it. For example the MU7000 has brilliant screen uniformity and almost no dirty screen effect (DSE) whereas the Q8FN is less than optimal in these areas. I would recommend looking at the Samsung NU7000 75" model from 2018 if you can still find one; failing that, TCL is a good "bang for buck" option in the budget LCD/LED category. Even in these lower end, edge lit, models, you will get some impactful results from YouTube 4k videos and even some Netflix HDR movies. Regardless of whatever TV you choose, a sound bar is always a good option.
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