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cyberacc

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Posts posted by cyberacc


  1. Does this unit work as a dlna server? (The manual is not clear to me.)

    We presently have a Sony DVR, which we love, but we often record programmes and want to watch them in another room (e.g. a bedroom).

    I want the MS408, connected via ethernet to my home network, then have a dlna-compliant TV, then hopefully just use the remote on the dlna TV to access the programmes I've recorded on the MS408. (So far I've found some Sony and Samsung televisions that claim to be dlna-compliant.)

    Secondly, assuming all this is possible, could I access a 1TB HDD in the HDD slot from the remote televisions, or would I be better buying the MS409 with its larger standard HDD?

    edit:

    P.S. I also have a PS3 with the "PlayTV" twin HD tuner and an upgraded (500GB) HDD, which apparently has some sort of dlna compliance.


  2. ??You can resume play with the current firmware (except if you eject the disc). Just select Options (triangle) with the movie stopped, and you can select Resume or Play from beginning.

    Thanks for telling us. Greatly appreciated. I got frustrated having to leave discs in pause, for fear of having to go through the copyright warnings all over again. This forum is magic.


  3. I bought a Sharp DVD player in 2000. It did not work properly out of the box. Sharp took months to get the part in from Japan - and the service company they sent me to made me pay a quotation fee of about $70. That experience has turned me right off their products. They may have improved, but I wouldn't trust them.

    To me Sony has always been a cut above Sharp - I guess that's why Sony products have been the standard in the TV industry for so many decades.


  4. We made a feature movie over March & April. We were using a Dell 24" 1920x1200 monitor, with component inputs.

    However we quickly found that the LCD monitors are totally inadequate for judging exposure. A second major problem was that despite accepting the 1080i input, it was actually doing some sort of scaling. (I suspect it was cutting off the left & right edges.) Therefore we found it was also impossible to be sure about focus and what detail was being captured (e.g. I suspect makeup could be seen in ECU's), and focus is particularly critical when filming HD. Having read various forums it appears that the only one of Dell's monitors that does not do the scaling problem is their 27" model. But this does not get around the inherent exposure problem.

    I suggest you go to dvinfo.net where they have many filmmaking forums, including a specific one on monitors at:

    http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/forumdisplay.php?f=112


  5. I'm a bit out of touch with the newer displays now available and was wondering whether someone could explain or point me to something I can read which deals with the pros and cons of going with a plasma, LCD, or rear unit display like SXRD

    As a filmmaker I would not consider anything but plasma or CRT. As a generalisation they have many more technical reasons to be more accurate than other types.

    LCD is horribly inaccurate, especially when viewed off-centre, and is subject to inconsistent brightness across the screen due to the use of backlighting. I have never seen an LCD that didn't give blown-out highlights. They lack subtlety.

    As for rear projection, most seem to still suffer from problems like lack of sharpness, off-centre poor performance and (depending on the type) convergence. I have even read about the much-loved (here) SXRD having the potential for convergence problems. I have a rear projection, love it, but it's for fun & not really for where "PQ is paramount".

    Finally the quality of the electronics is a major contributor to picture quality, so just because acme brand TV has an XYZ-manufactured screen is only a small part of the story. You mention that "PQ is paramount", but everyone's eyes and standards are different. See for yourself, but try to see the TVs in an environment that's similar to where you will place yours.

    Watch the flamers come in here. These are just my opinions.


  6. It means with our strong AU$ exchange ratio (0.8542 as per 09 May 2007), 60" Elite Pro will only cost AU$8780 RRP! It's amazing!!! :D

    Don't forget the Americans never include taxes in their prices. We have to add GST, plus the cost of a special tuner to suit out transmission standards (which does not have the economies of scale of the American market).


  7. Such discolouration is generally caused by a magnetic field. Perhaps you have a speaker, transformer (like that in an amplifier) or something else electrical near the screen. Even look in the next room. Perhaps move the television (when it's turned off, of course) if you can't find anything. I went to a place where there was an electric train line next to the window, in which case it is necessary to move the screen to the other side of the room.

    As the final possibility that I can think of, perhaps someone walks past with something electro or magnetic that affects the screen.


  8. You should be able to set your other tv onto widescreen mode, and this will stretch the picture out so it will look perfectly normal again. You should also be able to do this on your computer, so I don't see any problem with the Panasonic in your case.

    According to a table on page 4 of the Panasonic manual "Recording 16:9 aspect picture" "X (The picture is recorded in 4:3 aspect.)". What it is trying to explain is that only on the HDD and DVD-RAM will it record in 16:9 aspect (Widescreen). For DVD±R and ±RW it is "recorded in 4:3 aspect", I.E. the flag for 16:9 is missing.

    I just spoke to Panasonic & they confirmed that (the widescreen flag is missing and) you would have to adjust using a button on the TV (if available).

    Certainly my PCs' DVD players give no manual control over 16:9 or 4:3 so I would get a distorted picture. Panasonic is clearly trying to force people to use DVD-RAM despite the fact that most other brands of DVD players cannot read DVD-RAM, so you have to use DVD±R or ±RW for compatibility.

    So does the Sony suffer the same problem???


  9. Can the Sony HXD760 recorder record DVDs in full anamorphic widescreen, please?

    Yesterday I bought a Panasonic DMR-EX75, but before opening the box I read the manual on-line and found (which agrees with posts in this forum) that 16:9 programmes will be recorded as 4:3 on all types of DVDs (except DVD-RAM). Therefore any DVD±R or RW will show it as a squashed 4:3 picture on another DVD player or a computer screen (failing to put the 16:9 flag on the disc). All my TVs and computer monitors are widescreen.

    I am seriously considering taking the Panasonic back to the store on Monday to change it for the Sony. Too bad the Sony can't record NTSC or have HDMI.


  10. What a bad marketing move by Panasonic. Why on Earth would anyone spending well over $10,000 on a TV want a Meccano set? In other words, why doesn't it have a built-in Digital tuner. I don't want separate boxes and cables and electric wires. What a mess for so much money.

    I really want one of these big Panasonics, but no way will I buy one that's already obsolete. I'm not going to look at it with an analogue picture. It would be horrific to watch at 65 inches.


  11. ... Australian company with full 2 year warranty utilizing Samsung panel ...

    Unless all the electronics are the same as a Samsung I don't think it's reasonable to think of no-name brands as being the same.

    Additionally a no-name brand distributor may not have the expertise of a large name brand. There is no guarantee that their warranty will be any worth if the distributor goes out of business.

    I'd stick to the name brands. There are reasons why they have earned a name for themselves.


  12. Can the Sony HXD760 record DVDs in full anamorphic widescreen, please?

    Today I bought a Panasonic DMR-EX75, but before opening the box I read the manual on-line and found (which agrees with posts in this forum) that 16:9 programmes will be recorded as 4:3 on all types of DVDs (except DVD-RAM). Therefore any DVD±R or RW will show it as a squashed 4:3 picture on another DVD player or a computer screen (failing to put the 16:9 flag on the disc). All my TVs and computer monitors are widescreen.

    I am seriously considering taking the Panasonic back to the store on Monday to change it for the Sony. Too bad the Sony can't record NTSC or have HDMI.

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