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Bob51

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About Bob51

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  1. Harvey Norman in Martin Place had both the 46 B550 and 650 on display earlier this week
  2. Are you sure you have the right model number for the Samsung? $2200 is a very good price for the LA46B750, this is around the price for a 650. Also Samsung's website shows the bonus TV offer now only applies to their LED range. I'd take the 750 if you want the best TV; the Sony at $1991 plus a BD player if $$$ is important.
  3. I have the 46B650 and have not noticed any problems with glare/reflection but I suppose it depends on location. I considered the B750 but could not see the gain over the 650 to justify the $1000 extra asking price.
  4. Looking for a 46inch TV. Use is mainly FTA TV (mostly sport) and some DVD. No blu-ray player yet. Space prohibits size greater than 46 inch. Shortlist is Sony 46Z5500 and Samsung LA46B650. Currently favouring the Samsung, which is currently $2599 rrp including 22 inch TV by redemption although have seen at H-N for $2368. Any recommendtions based on performance, reliability would be appreciated, and best prices in Sydney. Cheers
  5. What is meant by 'activate and pay when you choose to watch'? Are you only able to view the movie once? If I hire a movie now it can be played as many times as the family wants within the rental period.
  6. Now that the dust is settling its worth speculating on MS's motives - and the following is speculation as I have no inside knowledge. MS never gave full support to Toshiba with HD-DVD. Why? - I reckon they wanted the war to continue as long as possible and gave just enough support to keep the fire going, but not enough support that would cause HD-DVD to win. I think this strategy was driven by two objectives : 1. Primary - MS did not want either disc format to succeed because they want people downloading HD content via the internet and playing it on PC based media centres running Windows software. They have long sought to integrate PCs and TVs to extend their revenue source. 2. Secondary - To blunt the appeal of PS3. Sony had a lot riding on the BD - PS3 complementary combination - ie BD driving sales of PS3 and vice versa. Create market confusion and lessen the appeal of BD and you also slow PS3 to the benefit of 360. The first was the most important as Windows and related software drives most of MS's profit. Thus they had more to gain by neither format succeeding than their games division would make if HD-DVD won and BD meant nothing for PS3. My guess is MS will be in no hurry to add BD to 360 and will only do so if it becomes a marketing necessity. In this context it is revealing that in January, the first month since the Warner's decision, PS3 outsold 360 for the first time in the US.
  7. My opinion of Toshiba has not changed but it was a bad commercial decision to try and get a separate format up solo. Once the 'heavy hitters' in the industry (Matsushita/Panasonic, Pioneer, Philips, Samsung) went with Sony the writing was on the wall. The lessons of VHS v Beta were not learned and the result repeated.
  8. Microsoft this week denied they will replace their HD-DVD add-on with a BD equivalent. Not surprising as the add-on idea has not been successful, with less than 1% of 360 owners buying one.
  9. I agree. Toshiba did a similar stock clearance when dropping Beta VCRs. Remaining stocks in their warehouse were sold off at heavily reduced prices (Myer/Grace Bros took a lot and sold them for $399 when the normal VCR price was around $599). Once cleared, Toshiba announced they would sell VHS but their decision was made much earlier.
  10. I agree. Toshiba did a similar stock clearance when dropping Beta VCRs. Remaining stocks in their warehouse were sold off at heavily reduced prices (Myer/Grace Bros took a lot and sold them for $399 when the normal VCR price was around $599). Once cleared, Toshiba announced they would sell VHS but their decision was made much earlier.
  11. Bing Lee at Hornsby in Sydney this week advertised a Sharp blu-ray player at $449. Model number not in advert.
  12. Re the statement by Mining Man : "Perhaps some realized very early in the piece, that in order to get wide market acceptance, penetration and success of HDM in the consumerspace a single format was required. Thus chose to back and promote the format with the greater evolutionary potential, both in marketability and technology." The first sentence is not BS. It is fact HDM has not achieved much penetration into the wider community. I've no doubt market research has been done on why, and I'll bet the competing formats has come up as one factor. It was certainly a reason put forward by Warners in their recent decision and we would be naive to dismiss it as BS. I won't buy into the argument of which format has the most evolutionary potential, but given the slow take up of HDM I can't see continuation of dual formats being sustainable.
  13. Getting back to the original question posed in this thread, BD manufacturers do not have to respond to Toshiba's price cuts. The Warners decision has put them in the box seat. From May some 70% of HD software will be on BD compared to 30% on HD-DVD. When a salesperson is asked by consumers which format to buy, and the software supply position is explained, very few people will opt for HD-DVD. Lack of assured longterm software is the biggest turnoff for the bulk of consumers - it is not region coding or profiles. Toshiba cannot overcome lack of software availability through advertising or more price cuts. Lack of other manufacturer support and now lack of studio support is likely to prove insurmountable.
  14. All this assumes we have broadband connectivity which is not the case for a large proportion of the community. And with Australia's large land area and low population density, this is not likely to change.
  15. JB in Sydney CBD had them marked at $215 within the last week or so. You might be able to negotiate them down a bit further.
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