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Owen

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About Owen

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  1. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    Actually the "specs" are wildly optimistic just like ALL DPL based projectors from the likes of BenQ and others using the same Texas Instruments optical system. If you divide the contrast spec by 10 your will be closer to the mark, and actual peak lumens will almost certainly be well under "spec" when colour is calibrated to be accurate. The typical drop is about 30% and often more. Do your self a favour and forget about "specs" they are just marketing, especially when comparing projectors from different maufacturers. Concentrate on actual real world test results with calibrated colour.
  2. A used JVC is the go, a better option then a new one IMHO.
  3. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    And since almost all of them use DLP imaging systems they have poor contrast and black level. The upward facing orientation also directs a disproportionate amount of reflected light up at the ceiling which degrades ANSI contrast if the ceiling is not black. UST projection systems are highly compromised and not suitable for high quality applications.
  4. A light metre is a waist of time, it won't tell you what you like, only your eyes can do that. Gamma adjustment has a large influence of auto aperture behaviour as does the the mastering choices of the movie producer. Other than during scrolling titles auto iris operation should hardly ever be obvious with the majority of movies if gamma is setup well. If you are satisfied with dark scene performance with the iris system locked there in no point in using it. While any dynamic contrast system is less than ideal, I find JVC's highest contrast projectors dark scene performance unacceptable without it and other brands are no starters.
  5. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    No probs mate. I wisely choose many years ago not to go into AV professionally as its not a game that pays well enough to be worth my while, and if you do something day to day the joy goes out of it and it just becomes work. If one does something professionally (for remuneration) time is money and the imperative is to do a "good enough" job for the client given the time available and quoted price then move on to the next job as quickly as possible. If you don't do that you wont be in business long. An "enthusiast" (thats me) is not on the clock and can take as much time as required to do the job properly, often using techniques and systems that are not viable comercially. I can also spend the time to do a heap of research and then evaluate the accuracy and validity of that research by practical experiment rather then just take what I read as fact, many more people should do that IMHO as it would expose a HEAP of misconceptions. The more knowledgeable and experienced I have become over the years the more obvious it is to me that many so called "professionals" don't know their stuff, they know enough to get by but the details elude them. I am particularly annoyed by many, if not most, "professional" reviewers of AV gear who post on the net and have long given everything they say with a bucket of salt and ALWAYS read between the lines. Now this is quite easy to do if you know your stuff but the average consumer has little chance and typically they read into things what they want to read as they don't know any better and have been programmed by marketing.
  6. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    I'll try and keep this brief. Over 40 years in AV gear and 18 years calibrating projectors. Any mug can "test" a projector, its a simple as turning it on, sitting down and watching it. The skill is interpreting what you see and understanding the issues that affect what you see and why you see it, that requires a clear understanding of complex subjects that are behind the limitations inherent in image capture and display. If you want any more info PM me, I will give you some subjects to study and some practical tasks to perform to start you on your leaning journey.
  7. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    That says it all. Unless you plan on buying several projectors just so you can do side by side comparisons any "differences" are going to be irrelevant. Concentrate on setup, it makes more "deference" to what you will actually see in your home when viewing a movie.
  8. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    I'm not nit picking peoples view, I am simply points out some basic facts that a lot of people find inconvenient. For example, the photos of the NX9 show very obvious over sharpening. Why, because I'm not a fanboy who blindly believes advertising BS? I have decades of experience and a LOT of technical knowledge gained via hands on experiment and testing not just reading crap on the net posted by people who have no technical knowledge. I don't think you get it mate, without sharpness (high MTF) we can't see resolution, they are linked. A very high resolution image with low MTF (sharpness) will look soft -blurred and lacking in visible detail while a lower resolution image with high MFT will look much sharper and more detailed. The NX9 images look digitally OVER SHARPENED. Javs posted a frame grab from the movie which can be seen in the link below. The top image is a photo of his JVC X7000 projector and the lower image is the original movie frame dump, thats what the movie is supposed to look like. Doesnt look so impressive now does it? Flat, dull, lacking in contrast and sharpness, but its got potently way more "resolution" than the photo of the projected image. https://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2996950-new-jvc-rs3000-nx9-rs2000-n7-rs1000-n5-native-4k-projectors-anticipation-thread-367.html#post57244656 Also keep in mind what I said about the X9900's internal sharpening. With quality external processing very significant improvements in image quality and clarity are easily obtained. When viewing motion video rather than still images temporal resolution plays a large part which levels the playing field even more. P.S. have a look at this linked comparison in Javs post, photo of E-Shift JVC projector compared to original "4K" image, not much in it now is there. Take away the camera limitations, such as over exposure (blown highlights), and its even less. http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/125691 Digitised images captured from the real world (movies) have NOTHING in common with PC text and graphics because ALL real world images MUST be low pass filtered so they have effectively zero response at the single pixel level, they are just a blur. With PC graphics you can have a black pixel next to a white pixel, but if we where to capture that with a camera we would get a 45% grey pixel next to a 55% grey pixel, best case. Thats effectively imposible for the eye to see and not at all what people expect to happen. With video images its all about mid frequency MTF (sharpness) not super high "resolution".
  9. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    What makes you think I am "upset"? Its clear many people have no interest in understanding why they see what they see, resolution and sharpness are distinctly different issues.
  10. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    I'm not lecturing you mate, just pointing out the limitations in your "comparison" photos. Javs did the same. How about comparing to the original video frame so it can be seen what the image is supposed to look like, as Javs has done?
  11. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    I have never used a projector more than that, two movies a week is a very good week and 99% will be 1080 not "4K". I spend more than the price of a Z1 every year on toys that are never or very seldom used, just admired. He who dies with the most toys wins. 😉 If history is any indication, it will take a few years for JVC to improve contrast in any significant way, and until they do I'm out.
  12. Owen

    2019 projector releases ?

    This is yet another case of a difference in sharpness being mistaken for a difference in "resolution", how easily people are fooled. No way resolution differences will be visible in photos like that, just sharpness and more is not better. As the original frame of video posted by Javs shows, the NX9 image is quite heavily over sharpened, it looks a lot sharper than the original movie and yet people think it looks good because it has more visible detail. Well guess what guys, thats what digital sharpening does and it has NOTHING to do with resolution. Factor in the mis matches in calibration and a fair comparison is not possible, way too many variables in play. I'm very curious what settings where used to get that over sharpened artifical look, if thats the default setup for the NX9 JVC should be ashamed, they are doing the same BS as Sony and pandering to the sharper is better brigade with digital enhancment, accuracy be damned. As Javs also pointed out that particular X9900 has issues and is not a good example of what is possible with an X series E-Shift JVC, especially a top model. Not withstanding the shortcomings of that particular example, the sharpening system used in the X series in general has always been very ordinary and must be disabled and replaced by external processing for best performance. It makes a remarkable deference in image clarity and visible detail without looking unnatural. When projectors are fully calibrated and optimised they will look VERY similar, so much so that I doubt any difference will be visible in typical photos like those posted by woofer, and when viewed in isolation without direct comparison as we do in normal use, viewers will have a very hard time picking which is which. Projector setup and optimisation will dominate what we see more so than the projector used when we get to this level. Just to be clear, I am NOT saying there are NO differences between an X series and the new native 4K models BUT its not anywhere near as significant as woofer's photos would suggest. Look at Javs photos to get a better idea, and when viewing a movie rather than still images the differences are significantly smaller again.
  13. Owen

    Screen size advice

    Actually people do. According to them, if we can get 30-35fL on screen we can get a great "HDR" picture. Now people no doubt get a picture they are delighted with BUT there is nothing "HDR" about the picture they see, the same image can easily be created with SDR video source if they setup thier projector to do it. Projector manufactures could easily provide a preset mode to do just that, but it would blow the lid of the HDR myth and be a bad marketing move. How do your get people to buy a new projector if they find out they can get the same result with SDR video on the projector they already own? The "limitation" is that projectors are standard dynamic range display devices, and with many projector - screen combinations less than SDR, feeding them HDR video doesn't change that.
  14. Owen

    Screen size advice

    Domestic SDR video, which is what we have on 1080 Bluray, is mastered for 30fl (100 nits), how many times do I have to point his out????? 30fl IS the SDR statndard. The target display device is a TV operating in a non dark environment and a high average picture level is desirable for domestic viewing environments so a display gamma of 2.2 is the calibration target. Cinemas could not provide 30fL so the standard for cinemas is about 15fL, which was generally achievable but not always. HOWEVER the video mastered for cinemas is mastered for about 15fl NOT 30fL like domestic video AND the system gamma is different to domestic video as well. Put simply, the cinema standard is LESS THAN SDR, in fact a cinema has about half the dynamic range of a 40 year old CRT TV that the SDR standard was designed for. We typically have displayed 1080 Bluary source at about the same brightness as a commercial cinema even though the video was not mastered for that application. A display gamma of 2.2 suitable for TV use is not ideal and tends to provide an image thats lacking in depth and "pop" so a display gamma of 2.4 or even 2.6 is often preferred. Altering gamma does not affect the black level or the peak white level at all, it simply lowers the levels in between black and white which in turn makes the average picture level dimmer and looks more HDR like. The HDR "standard" is 1000 nits plus with some video already being mastered for 4000 nits. Again its designed for TV's not projectors and the target display gamma is VERY, VERY different due to the VERY high display brightness intended to be used. HDR is mastered for displays running at 10 to 40 times the peak brightness of SDR, thats more than 3 to 5 stops brighter. Now if we say that 15fL is notionally "SDR" on a projector HDR is required to be 10 to 40 times brighter, or 150 to 600fL, to give the same effective result. Thats VASTLY different to the sort of light output we can expect from a domestic projector, so calling anything we view on a projector "HDR" is simple ridiculous, it's so far off its silly. Now people say, "but HDR looks so good on my projector" even though they are looking at maybe 30fL, thats because we don't need a lot of brightness to get a fantastic picture on a big screen in a dark room, we never did. The quality of the image is dominated by image gamma which must be matched to the peak brightness of the display, and since a projector has only a fraction of the brightness of a HDR TV that the video was mastered for gamma MUST be heavily remapped. If we choose to display HDR via a projector at say 15fL, as many people do for SDR video, we need to remap HDR back to the same effective on screen gamma as we would use for SDR at 15 fL, and when we do that, guess what, SDR and HDR look THE SAME. Same black level, same white level and the same at every level in between. Modern projectors often have more brightness than is required so people often don't run them at full output as it looks too bright with SDR video using the standard gamma the projector comes setup with by default. To get some sort of HDR "look" with HDR video the projector must run flat out to be as bright as possible, and may be able to provide 30 to 40fL on a relatively small screen. The projector then re maps HDR video to look as good as possible, or what the manufacturer thought the average punter would like, at the brightness level available. Yes it looks different - better than SDR looks by default at 15fL and so it should, 15fL is only HALF SDR. Now comes the part no one seems to talk about, why I don't know. We can run the projector flat out for SDR video source and get the exact same black level, peak white level AND DYNAMIC RANGE we get with "so called" HDR on a projector. When we do that we can and should remap the gamma of SDR to match what HDR is remapped to when it is displayed at the same brightness, if we don't the image will be too bright, lack depth and overall look very different to HDR. So when people say HDR looks "better" than SDR on their projector they are comparing apples to oranges. The mastering of the video source is different, the display brightness is different, the system gamma is very different, the colour calibration is different. Pretty much all the major influencing factors that affect what we see on screen are different so its no surprise they don't look the same. With so many fundamental difference its amazing they look so similar. When we setup a projector so that SDR and HDR are properly matched on screen its no surprise that the visible differences disappear. On a title by title basis is possible to get the HDR and SDR disk visions of a movie to look effectively identical, if I get it right I simply can't tell which is which. Not only that, I can make either look however I want it to look. For optimal results with SDR and HDR a range of gamma presets is required, this is especially important with HDR as its inconsistent from title to title, much more so than SDR. Therefore a single HDR setup is always going to be a compromise and unfortunately projectors don't have enough programable modes to allow more than a couple of gamma setups. I use a PC as a video source and can call up an appropriate gamma map in a moment. I can make an individual map for every individual movie title if need be, there is no limit. Can we please accept that there is no such thing as HDR on a projector, we only have approximately SDR or less. Projectors are HDR "compatible" but NOT HDR "capable", both Sony and JVC admit this because its a fact so lets get past the HDR BS please. We don't have it and don't need it for a fantastic picture that blows any HDR TV into the weeds.
  15. Owen

    Screen size advice

    I never said it doesn't look good, the point is 30fL (100 nits) is NOT HDA. Thats not what people want to here but its a fact. If 30fL is HDR a 40 year old CRT TV is a HDR display, they could do 30fL or more. In fact, that old CRT had a greater dynamic range than any digital projector because it could do absolute black. If the gamma of SDR and HDR video is setup to give the same on screen gamma and the same peak light output, lets say 30fL, the resulting picture is effectively identical. Same black point, same white point and same video levels in between. Once you understand how to adjust gamma you can make the picture look however you want it to look, you have almost compete control and thats very valuable.
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