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TomAus

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TomAus last won the day on June 2 2017

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About TomAus

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  1. Polestar is teasing about what seems to be a new concept model or perhaps a new, third model. From an email I received today: "Precept: a rule intended to inform behaviour or thought. Something that shows the direction that Polestar is heading in. Something that shows how the future of Polestar will look and feel. Something that we’ll tell the world about on February 25th."
  2. I'm not aware of any recommendations as I imagine this would depend on several different factors. However, they do provide some information about it's functionality on their website. From their website: "The Kharma Listening chair is specially sculpted to enjoy a musical performance in every way. The chair in its upright listening position brings an active posture to unravel a musical masterpiece, while it can also be transformed to a laidback lounge chair to forget the world around us and enjoy our favourite music. By just a touch of a finger, you control the built-in motor to settle into your desired position."
  3. A spectacular speaker deserves a spectacular listening chair. This is from Dutch speaker manufacturer Kharma.
  4. I haven't yet been there myself, but have friends who have and who shared photos. From what I've heard, the food is quite nice. Here is a photo of the same Wilson system with an additional turntable:
  5. They are Wilson Audio WAMM. A few months ago this system consisted of two turntables. They were also using Mark Levinson to power the Gryphons, so they rotate their gear just like many of us on this forum.
  6. Thanks for putting in the effort. I'm not able to view any of the attachments, are you able to check?
  7. Seems we should discuss EVs when we next catch up, Al. Though next time will likely be without any Avantgarde speakers. If we bring the discussion back to EV affordability, the point I’m slowly making is that leading markets are leaders due to incentivising EVs, resulting in higher EV sales compared to markets which do not incentivise. The benefit of incentives for potential buyers in for example the UK is that they can purchase a new electric Skoda Citigo-e for nearly $7k less than an entry level Mazda 3. As for potential buyers in Norway, they can purchase an entry level electric Kona for slightly less than an entry level Mazda 3. These are just two examples of how incentives can make EVs more affordable and thereby a more likely choice. As for the Skoda Citigo-e, I see there are no plans to bring it to Australia which in my view is understandable - I can’t see that it would be offered at a decent price without any incentives.
  8. For the sake of argument, let’s say that this is common knowledge. That everyone is aware that our current emission standards and fuel quality will negatively effect our life expectancy, will negatively impact our health, will lead to higher health costs as well as insurance premiums – if this is indeed common knowledge then the obvious question is why don’t we do something about it? Why do we maintain the status quo? That an increase in electrical vehicles would not be beneficial due to our dirty power is not correct and has already been debunked earlier in this thread, so let’s leave it at that. I agree that much can be done across many areas to reduce emissions and what each of us can do will vary. We should however be able to work across multiple areas in parallel and reducing vehicle emissions should be one of those areas, and in my view an obvious choice. You sound like a politician, Al It will take time here, yes. But it doesn’t have to. There was an article a few months back where a few, unnamed manufacturers indicated we’re currently 10 years behind the leading markets. While we can debate the exact number of years, there’s no question that there are others well ahead of us.
  9. Let’s not forget the reason why cities and countries elsewhere are embracing EVs – they pollute less than comparable ICE vehicles, thereby reducing air pollution which has a harmful effect on human health. In the UK, it’s estimated that 10,000 people die prematurely every year due to car and van pollution, diesel vehicles being the main culprit, with annual costs to society estimated to more than £6 billion. Sure, newer and cleaner vehicles are more expensive than older and dirtier vehicles. Though when comparing the two, one should take into consideration that the cost of a high emission vehicle goes beyond its sticker price. What’s viewed as affordable will vary, though I would say there are markets where EVs already are affordable. Over the coming years we’ll see a significant increase in available EV models as well as vehicles at lower price points (Skoda Citigo-e iV looks promising). As for what will happen locally, only time will tell, but as mentioned in the Financial Review article “lack of incentives for consumers to buy electric cars means the market is guaranteed to be small".
  10. Agreed, Prof. A recent article in Financial Review offered a similar perspective. Chinese car giant slams electric car black hole WWW.AFR.COM SAIC plans to launch an MG brand electric car in Australia in 2020 but the lack of incentives to buy electric cars, means the market is guaranteed to be small. Chinese car giant slams electric car black hole China’s biggest carmaker, SAIC, has criticised Australia’s “unique” lack of policy incentives for the electric car industry, saying the policy black hole is preventing a healthy market for environmentally friendly vehicles from developing. SAIC, which owns the formerly British-owned car brand MG, plans to launch an MG brand electric car in Australia in 2020. SAIC's Pure Electric SUV concept car debuted at the 2018 Beijing Auto Show. But Matt Lei, deputy managing director of the company’s international business department, said the lack of incentives for consumers to buy electric cars means the market is guaranteed to be small. “The Australian market is quite unique,” he said. “Basically, there is no policy to incentivise electric vehicles or new energy vehicles. “In Europe they have very strict emission regulation. They are gradually lifting the bars to further prevent emissions. That’s why we’ve seen a significant reduction of diesel vehicles in Europe. While for Australia it’s a very, very unique situation. There is no policy.” Mr Lei, who is based at the $133 billion-a-year company’s Shanghai headquarters, said SAIC still believed there would be a portion of Australian customers who would spend the extra money out of environmental concerns. But the market would be “small”. “Like I said, electric vehicles are more expensive than the traditional ones,” he said. In China, electric cars were on average around double the price of equivalent traditional cars, he said. SAIC’s electric SUV will sell in Australia for $46,000. Despite SAIC’s pro-electric rhetoric, the vast majority of its cars use traditional internal combustion engines. Of the more-than 7 million vehicles it sold in 2018, just 140,000 of them were electric. Mr Lei said the Shanghai authorities had encouraged the take-up of electric vehicles by waiving the prohibitively expensive registration tax on traditional cars, which costs per vehicle $10,000. But he said even this wasn’t enough to get large numbers of consumers to buy electric cars. “In emerging markets, a lot of people are very price sensitive. So you say, ‘I’ll give you this feature, that feature,’ and they say, ‘No, I don’t want these features, I want something I can drive in the rain that’s better than my motorbike. That is good enough.’ “So there are people going after electric vehicles, and there are also people who prefer traditional vehicles. For us, we need to be prepared for all these customers.” He said growth in the Chinese market was slowing, as public transport improves and as the fashion for buying flashy new cars as a way of demonstrating wealth diminishes. As a result, he said SAIC was targeting six new markets: Thailand, Indonesia, the UK, Chile, New Zealand and Australia. In Australia, SAIC is still a small player, selling just 7000 vehicles in 2018, all under the MG brand. It expects it will more than double that this year to 14,500. In China, it has deals with Volkswagen and General Motors to build some of their brands along side its own. Carbon dioxide emissions from transport accounted for 18.8 per cent of Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions in the year to March 31, 2018, according to the Department of the Environment and Energy. That made transport the third-biggest emitter after electricity generation and stationary energy. Emissions from the transport sector increased 1.3 per cent year on year to 101.2 million tonnes of carbon dioxide, or the equivalent quantity of other greenhouse gases. The increase was driven by a surge in the use of diesel vehicles. Labor, under Bill Shorten, went to the 2019 federal election with a promise to ensure that 50 per cent of new cars sold in 2030 would be electric vehicles. The ultimately victorious Coalition attacked this policy vociferously, saying Labor was telling Australians what cars to drive. Mr Lei said SAIC kept a close watch on developments in Canberra but offered no view on whether a shift towards electric vehicles was inevitable in Australia.
  11. It might be worth contacting Mark Coles at Sablon Audio, as Carmine supplies connectors to his higher end cables.
  12. I would like to purchase these if still available. Will send you a PM.
  13. My understanding is that one needs to rip from a CD to get the benefit of their metadata retrieval. The user manual, found here https://www.dropbox.com/s/yz5ou15rtixnk5c/aria piccolo_ANDROID_UserManual.pdf?dl=0 , does mention importing (and exporting) files as well as adding missing cover art, though does not specially cover your question. I suggest it is still worth having a look through the manual as it provides a helpful understanding of Piccolo functionality.
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