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Steffen

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About Steffen

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  1. Further information: For sale is my 10” Tannoy sub. I’ve decided to go sub-less for the time being. It is in excellent cosmetic condition and works perfectly. The sub has variable phase control (as opposed to a polarity switch labelled “phase”) and a 2nd-order low-pass, which makes it a cinch to integrate with sealed box speakers. The finish is dark grey vinyl. It looks almost black in reality, even though my phone camera tried to raise it to a medium grey. Specs are here. The price includes a 10% donation to SNA. Due to the bulk of t
  2. Yes, each of these 1200x400 panels weighs 10kg – not advisable for overhead mounting, but no issue on the walls.
  3. Gosh, just look at all the knobs and buttons on those vintage Rotels! 👍x After foolishly sticking with Musical Fidelity class-A for decades I made a huge upgrade to a semi-vintage Rotel amp last year. It is rather barren in the knob department, though, and that’s just the way I like it
  4. Those measurements look very agreeable to me. If it sounds good, you’ve done a good job! My audiophile spider senses tingle when I get startling holographic imaging out of well recorded tracks. I’d take that over any residual bass bumps, if treating those means ruining the imaging. The only thing to add now are some cable risers. /jk
  5. I noticed that when switching in DSP for room EQ.
  6. I quite liked him in his early roles, like in Empire of the Sun, or Treasure Island.
  7. That’s a very fitting turn of phrase, I’m going to reuse that
  8. It does benefit from Whites anti-vibration pads, though.
  9. I used MDF for most of the parts (except the plywood sheets and the meranti DAR spacers). Mainly because it was the most cost effective option. The router bit is 8mm. Of course that means the fractal strips are 40mm wide, making the unit width of the panel 56mm, and the panel 392mm overall (instead of 400mm). I thought that was close enough. I didn’t like idea of having to use multiple router passes for each cut. The fractal strips are 12mm MDF, so the router cuts are 2.4mm and 4.8mm deep, respectively. That was easily done with single passes and a reasonably cheap bit.
  10. In the absence of specialised lubricants, I find that methylated spirit works well for tapping aluminium. It keeps the metal from sticking to the tool and itself. That’s what we were taught to use as apprentices some 40 years ago.
  11. The advantage of sandblasting garnet is that it is about twice as heavy as sand. Coral sand would be even lighter. Lead shot would be best, but I haven’t tried it because it looks like you can’t buy it without a gun license (also, my aim isn’t nearly good enough).
  12. Ah yes, I explored many of these options myself during the past three years. There is (or used to be) actually a place in Latvia that sells all kinds of polystyrene diffuser profiles (incl. skyline and Arqen look-alikes), but they get pretty expensive by the time you get enough coverage (from memory, well over $100 for 1200x400). Local manufacture seemed even pricier. I also looked at the DYI skyline option. There are several online calculators available that let you explore different depths and cell sizes, and predict the efficiency. In the end, if made from DAR timber, it would h
  13. With a proper workshop (table saw, work bench, router table) this would be a cinch, and done in no time. Alas, I only had a track saw and a plunge router (from world renowned tool brands Ozito and WorkZone 😆), and an old door blade on saw horses as work bench. That made it more work than it should have been. Anyway, I’m looking forward to mounting the panels on the walls, and I’m expecting nothing short of a dramatic improvement
  14. Yes, I often think we don’t quite understand what’s important and what isn’t. Our hearing is very good at adjusting to certain tonal differences, to the extent that they don’t bother us at all. That’s probably because tonal colourations occur naturally in daily life all the time. We can have a conversation with someone while walking from the living room, through the hall, outside and into the garage, without blinking an eye, despite the tonal changes being massive. On the other hand, slight colourations of certain tones bother us a lot, and make things sound bad and unnatural. Since our hearin
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