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proftournesol

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proftournesol last won the day on December 15 2017

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About proftournesol

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  • Birthday 22/09/1956

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    Michael

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  1. I found this concerning article on The New Daily “Whether it’s broadband or energy, the Coalition are driving up prices, playing politics with technology, and misleading regional Australians.” Mark Gregory, an associate professor in network engineering at RMIT University, slammed the NBN Co’s failure to spend the $200 million on upgrading its “underperforming” fixed wireless network in regional Australia. “The $200 million CAPEX allocated in FY19 should have been used to improve the performance of the fixed wireless network.” Dr Gregory called for a royal commission into the NBN rollout. ‘Poorly designed’ tax will leave regional Australians with ‘second-rate’ internet The broadband tax will result in regional Australians continuing to “suffer” with “second-rate” internet, according to telco OptiComm. In its submission to last month’s Senate inquiry, OptiComm said the “poorly designed narrow targeting of the tax” on non-NBN fixed-line services will allow bigger telcos including Telstra and Optus to bypass the NBN with mobile and wireless plans and “avoid paying the tax, therefore distorting competition and allowing them to avoid contributing their fair share to regional Australia”. OptiComm said the tax “fails to provide adequate and sustainable funding” for regional Australia. “Regional residents will continue to suffer with second-rate services as NBN Co will not be able to provide and update adequate infrastructure/capacity while it is paying for 95 per cent of the cost itself,” the firm said. “The large cost of delivering good regional infrastructure without adequate funding will be unsustainable.” Watch The News in 90 Seconds
  2. It is strange, most people like Rock 'n' Roll Animal, and that's basically Berlin live
  3. The Model S in Mt Isa belongs to the lady who was the first to circumnavigate Australia in an EV
  4. The amp looks like a Phase Linear, a Marantz on steroids The tuner looks like a Marantz. Nice
  5. It'll have enough battery to also power and recharge tools on site, and provide an air compressor. Of course, it'll tow (there's a Youtube video of a Model X towing an Airbus, but the range will be reduced, as it is with any other vehicle
  6. It'll need wing mirrors, indicators and probably have to ditch the cool strip headlight. The basic shape of folded stainless steel will be unchanged though. I'm not sure how bullet-proof stainless steel can pass safety testing, but as secondary safety is such a core feature of Tesla designs, I'm sure that it's built in. I'll be interested to see how it performs on pedestrian impact tests
  7. I think that it's designed to slow the growth of EVs. I already pay GST on the power I import from the grid, so it's hardly tax free. I paid what in effect is a 'battery tax' when I bought my car as the cost of the battery pushed the car into LCT territory
  8. RHD probably won't start until 2022, first it's be the trimotors, then dual, then single. I'm thinking about the dual motor. The design certainly is polarising and I was bemused when it was revealed, as were many others. Like many others though, it's grown on me. The only concern is the size, it'll make my Model S feel like a Mini - not a problem at home (in the country) but an issue when we drive (or it drives us) to Melbourne
  9. Apparently, 500,000 pre-orders for the Cybertruck. I'm seriously thinking about it
  10. To be fair, computing power and capability has improved 'somewhat' over the years
  11. 6 year lead for Tesla https://electrek.co/2020/02/17/tesla-teardown-6-years-lead-over-toyota-vw/?utm_medium=40digest.intl.carousel&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign https://futurism.com/the-byte/tesla-computer-hardware-stuns-competitors?utm_medium=40digest.intl.carousel&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign
  12. Yes, for a short time Model S & X had ridiculous pricing. The good and bad thing about Tesla is that they aren't afraid to try things, often they work, sometimes they are just daft ideas. Luckily, they are pretty good at learning from their mistakes. Make lots of mistakes = learn a lot
  13. Tesla pricing has always been US price x exchange rate + shipping + local taxes. There's a lotta taxes. To be fair to Tesla though, I bought my Model S in 2015 when the dollar was at parity. The cost of a new Model S is pretty much the same now and you get a lot more car for the same money. Imagine of the dollar was still at parity....
  14. You can see that the biggest factor responsible is the exchange rate
  15. In theory, yes. The problem, certainly here, is going to be shortage of suitable sites with the 800V power requirements. Porsche are gambling on 800V
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