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nedrum

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About nedrum

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  1. I feel the 'Risk of Closure' tag might be mod error (especially given there were two in a short period). I would have thought this is applied to threads that are starting to go off track, rather than a fairly standard for sale post.
  2. Bit of googling leads me to believe this is S1. It looks like design wise, the S2 and S3 transitioned to the green Creek label
  3. I like the look with grills on (I only have an older model C2 centre), but find the sound without the grills a little smoother to my ears
  4. EDIT: Sorry, forgot the Lenehan ML1 Reference...they sounded bloody amazing! Had a blast on Saturday, starting at 10am and finishing at about 4pm....so much good stuff! My favs were... The Audio Marketing room. The Serhan + Swift Brigadier Mu.2 bookshelf speaker partnered with Musical Fidelity gear. Tiny speakers with a massive and clear sound, these are probably my fav's of the whole show. They also had some Stax headphones that sounded great The new Richter Merlin S6 bookshelf sounded great for $1k. I hadn't heard anything from them before so was really impressed and would definitely consider them at that price range. The new Acoustic Energy gear, partnered with Creek, looked good and was also great value for money. So many good bookshelves! The Kef LSX/LS50 were fantastic (this is the first time I've heard them). I was really impressed with the sound given how easy they are to setup and use, as well as how good they looked. Imaging from the coax driver really impressed me. The Wisdom Audio room. Over $100k worth of home theatre gear. The sound was great, but the vision from the Barco Bragi was just incredible. I didn't get why anyone would spend more than a couple of grand on a projector until I saw this. Just mind blowing! I REALLY liked the Yamaha setup by CAV. It brought back memories of a pair of JBL TLX18's my brother used to owned - good impact without the hard midrange a lot of speakers chasing a similar dynamic seem to present. Plus, the whole setup looked fantastic. There were a few other rooms that sounded great but seemed either more interested in talking to individuals than demonstrating the gear, or the music wasn't to my taste.
  5. Hey, Are there any sessions that should be booked before the show, similar to the Krix room last year? Cheers, Mike
  6. Oh wow did not expect this...can't wait to hear them in a couple of weeks!
  7. I'm also interested in your thoughts Eskay...how are you finding them?
  8. I'd originally planned to add more images, but Snrub did such a good job with pics in his review that you'd be better off heading there to see what they look like up close 😊 Similar to Snrub, Audiofly provided me a pair of their 2nd best in ear monitors for review after I responded to call out on their sponsor forum – the AUD$649 AF180 Mk2. I’ve been using them for the past month and will be handing them back at the Hifi Show in October. They also asked for the review to be posted in both the Product Reviews & Opinions forum and Audiofly forum, hence it can be found in both places ***************************** Introduction Audiofly is a relatively young company and many of us would have been introduced to them at the ‘other’ hifi show here in Melbourne many year ago. I remember being impressed by how comfortable and decent the sound quality was for a new outfit. Not that they were blowing away the competition but I would have classed their products as ‘competitive’ for the value-conscious among us. Fast forward several years and their range now covers everything from the AUD$40 AF33C Mk2 to Bluetooth and true wireless options all the way up to the AUD$850 1120 Mk2 In Ear Monitors – 13 models in all! Unboxing The box is nice but unremarkable, matte black with a frequency response graph on the back. Open it up, however, and you’re greeted with a fantastic hard protective case and a range of accessories, including dome silicone, tri-flange silicone and Comply Premium earphone tips. I used the dome silicone exclusively as I’m not a fan of the sound of Comply tips and find multiple-flange buds uncomfortable for long term listening. There’s also an air plane adaptor, wax cleaner, 3.5mm to 6.3mm Adapter and cable clip. Most definitely a fully featured piece of kit, although that’s expected for the price! Aesthetic Once out of the box, they feel light but strong in hand. This is great for someone like me, who tends to listen to music for long periods during my work day. Having tried to love the Campfire Comets for the last six months, these came as a blessing. Where the heft of the stainless steel bodied Comets combined with their enormous nozzle left considerable weight painfully ‘hanging’ off the bottom half of my ear, I found myself forgetting the Audiofly’s were even there. The combination of lightness, over ear by design and a narrow nozzle meant even with my minuscule ear canals I could forget they were there and just enjoy the music. They don’t have a mic or in-line controls, however the connectors in these Mk 2 variants have been upgraded the to the universal MMCX standard. This means you can purchase any number of third party cables if you see fit, or even the new Mk2 Audiofly Bluetooth cable (AUD$99.99) for a little more convenience. Sound Note: I’ve created a Spotify playlist (bottom of review) with the music mentioned below as well as some other songs I enjoyed listening to for this review. Fair warning – I haven’t ever owned head gear in the same league as the Audiofly’s… · Audio Technica MSR7 (Headphones) – Accurate but not what I would call ‘musical’ · Audio Technica IM50 (IEM) – Great sounding but uncomfortable · B&O H3 (In Ear Headphone) – Received as a gift. Not a fan at all · Sony MDR-EX650AP (In Ear Headphone) – Great sounding, comfortable and affordable · Lypertek Tevi (True Wireless) – Excellent sound (has built in DSP) and comfortable During my time with the Audiofly’s, I listened to a range of music in quality varying from SoundCloud (64kbps) to Spotify (320kbps) to 96/24 from HD Tracks. This was mostly done via DragonFly Black with DragonTail on a Samsung S8. However, I also swapped in my brothers LG V30 with Quad HiFi DAC for some of the Hi-Res listening. As the lowest quality variant, SoundCloud sounded surprisingly good. Being close to neutral, my favourite lower-res electronic and hip-hop mixes sounded quite good. These won’t leave you hating your favourite tracks just because it isn’t mastered in a multi-million-dollar studio or in the highest quality format. One point for the ‘Music First Audiophiles’ among us! Moving up to Spotify, the real strengths of these earbuds start to become apparent. The muddled bass that creeps in as the volume goes up in cheaper buds was nowhere to be found. Turn the volume up…and up…and up…and no matter the complexity of the piece I was hearing everything – imaging was retained along with the full power of the music with no harshness or sibilance. The drums of the Nashville Symphony Orchestra’s rendition of Percussion Concerto: I. Con forza presented a wall of sound that left me emotionally exhausted – in a good way. Classical music took on a more ‘epic’ feel, with each instrument retaining its place in the broad orchestral image regardless of volume. Those drums were loud, deep and taut but the sound was never tiring or fatiguing. Soul music also left me tapping my toes. Donny Hathaway Live was a great end to end listen. The light chatter from the crowd (low and often heard as intrusive ‘noise’ on lesser setups) comes through softly but clearly, only adding to the live feel of the album. The sound stage presents each musician in their own space and isn’t smeared during more complex passages. The 96/24 download of Tool’s new Album, Fear Inoculum, is simply stunning. Skip straight to the second track, Pneuma, and each drum hit sits clearly alongside guitars and vocals – all clearly identifiable with each drum hit satisfyingly panning across the stage as required. The Hi-Res mix also sounded noticeably better than the Spotify mix, with the earbuds really taking advantage of the increased resolution (although knowing Tool, there’s every chance they mastered the Spotify mix to sound worse than CD or Hi-Res!). The last ounce of head crushing bass presented by a more V-shaped presentation is missing, but Audiofly is fairly clear these are about ‘a perfect balance between bass, mids and highs’. The 96/24 version of Sæglópur, from Sigur Rós, has always shown up the shortcomings of any gear. The first section is a light breathy mix of noise, vocals and triangle that loses much of its nuance behind a piano in the foreground – high levels of control and a balanced sound are needed for this. The second part is a ‘wall of sound’ that benefits from strong clear bass and smears the sound stage and buries the vocals on lesser systems. The Audiofly’s presented, as my brother put it, ‘the best first part I’ve ever heard’. Every bit of soundscape was there and clearly presented behind the piano. My brother didn’t believe the second part was the best he’s heard in terms of bass, but it’s accuracy meant vocals came through clearly and the aural image was more emotional than expected. I personally felt it was the best I’ve heard given my preference for a more open and clean (rather than warm and bassy) sound. Another bonus for the streetwalkers among us is the very low levels of microphonics – that is, mechanical noise created when you bump or rub the cable. This might sound silly for those who haven’t experienced it, but it can be annoying when you’re walking down the street with the cable rubbing against your shirt. This doesn’t seem to be much of an issue for the Audiofly’s as mechanical noise is kept to a minimum. Conclusion I’ve really enjoyed borrowing these and they have me rethinking how much to spend on my next set of earbuds for daily use. Their fantastic sound quality and supreme comfort mean you’d be silly not to put them on the shortlist for your next purchase, regardless of price. Pros + Clean, neutral and balanced sound + Incredible imaging + Retains composure at all volumes + Easy to drive + Low levels of microphonics + Super comfortable + Universal MMCX connector Cons - No mic or in-line controls out of the box - Some may prefer a more V-shaped sound Specs · Driver type: Four balanced armature drivers with 3-way crossover · Driver arrangement: Dual bass, single mid, single high · Frequency range: 15Hz-25kHz · Crossover: Passive 3-way electronic crossover with Butterworth filter · Acoustic tuning: Physical 3-way frequency divider · Impedance: 16Ω · Sensitivity: 104dB at 1kHz · Cable length: 1.2m / 47” · Plug type: 3.5mm gold plated, right angle format Playlist
  9. I'd originally planned to add more images, but Snrub did such a good job with his pics that you'd be better off heading over to that review to see what they look like up close 😊 Similar to Snrub, Audiofly provided me a pair of their 2nd best in ear monitors for review after I responded to call out on their sponsor forum – the AUD$649 AF180 Mk2. I’ve been using them for the past month and will be handing them back at the Hifi Show in October. ***************************** Introduction Audiofly is a relatively young company and many of us would have been introduced to them at the ‘other’ hifi show here in Melbourne many year ago. I remember being impressed by how comfortable and decent the sound quality was for a new outfit. Not that they were blowing away the competition but I would have classed their products as ‘competitive’ for the value-conscious among us. Fast forward several years and their range now covers everything from the AUD$40 AF33C Mk2 to Bluetooth and true wireless options all the way up to the AUD$850 1120 Mk2 In Ear Monitors – 13 models in all! Unboxing The box is nice but unremarkable, matte black with a frequency response graph on the back. Open it up, however, and you’re greeted with a fantastic hard protective case and a range of accessories, including dome silicone, tri-flange silicone and Comply Premium earphone tips. I used the dome silicone exclusively as I’m not a fan of the sound of Comply tips and find multiple-flange buds uncomfortable for long term listening. There’s also an air plane adaptor, wax cleaner, 3.5mm to 6.3mm Adapter and cable clip. Most definitely a fully featured piece of kit, although that’s expected for the price! Aesthetic Once out of the box, they feel light but strong in hand. This is great for someone like me, who tends to listen to music for long periods during my work day. Having tried to love the Campfire Comets for the last six months, these came as a blessing. Where the heft of the stainless steel bodied Comets combined with their enormous nozzle left considerable weight painfully ‘hanging’ off the bottom half of my ear, I found myself forgetting the Audiofly’s were even there. The combination of lightness, over ear by design and a narrow nozzle meant even with my minuscule ear canals I could forget they were there and just enjoy the music. They don’t have a mic or in-line controls, however the connectors in these Mk 2 variants have been upgraded the to the universal MMCX standard. This means you can purchase any number of third party cables if you see fit, or even the new Mk2 Audiofly Bluetooth cable (AUD$99.99) for a little more convenience. Sound Note: I’ve created a Spotify playlist (bottom of review) with the music mentioned below as well as some other songs I enjoyed listening to for this review. Fair warning – I haven’t ever owned head gear in the same league as the Audiofly’s… · Audio Technica MSR7 (Headphones) – Accurate but not what I would call ‘musical’ · Audio Technica IM50 (IEM) – Great sounding but uncomfortable · B&O H3 (In Ear Headphone) – Received as a gift. Not a fan at all · Sony MDR-EX650AP (In Ear Headphone) – Great sounding, comfortable and affordable · Lypertek Tevi (True Wireless) – Excellent sound (has built in DSP) and comfortable During my time with the Audiofly’s, I listened to a range of music in quality varying from SoundCloud (64kbps) to Spotify (320kbps) to 96/24 from HD Tracks. This was mostly done via DragonFly Black with DragonTail on a Samsung S8. However, I also swapped in my brothers LG V30 with Quad HiFi DAC for some of the Hi-Res listening. As the lowest quality variant, SoundCloud sounded surprisingly good. Being close to neutral, my favourite lower-res electronic and hip-hop mixes sounded quite good. These won’t leave you hating your favourite tracks just because it isn’t mastered in a multi-million-dollar studio or in the highest quality format. One point for the ‘Music First Audiophiles’ among us! Moving up to Spotify, the real strengths of these earbuds start to become apparent. The muddled bass that creeps in as the volume goes up in cheaper buds was nowhere to be found. Turn the volume up…and up…and up…and no matter the complexity of the piece I was hearing everything – imaging was retained along with the full power of the music with no harshness or sibilance. The drums of the Nashville Symphony Orchestra’s rendition of Percussion Concerto: I. Con forza presented a wall of sound that left me emotionally exhausted – in a good way. Classical music took on a more ‘epic’ feel, with each instrument retaining its place in the broad orchestral image regardless of volume. Those drums were loud, deep and taut but the sound was never tiring or fatiguing. Soul music also left me tapping my toes. Donny Hathaway Live was a great end to end listen. The light chatter from the crowd (low and often heard as intrusive ‘noise’ on lesser setups) comes through softly but clearly, only adding to the live feel of the album. The soundstage presents each musician in their own space and isn’t smeared during more complex passages. The 96/24 download of Tool’s new Album, Fear Inoculum, is simply stunning. Skip straight to the second track, Pneuma, and each drum hit sits clearly alongside guitars and vocals – all clearly identifiable with each drum hit satisfyingly panning across the stage as required. The Hi-Res mix also sounded noticeably better than the Spotify mix, with the earbuds really taking advantage of the increased resolution (although knowing Tool, there’s every chance they mastered the Spotify mix to sound worse than CD or Hi-Res!). The last ounce of head crushing bass presented by a more V-shaped presentation is missing, but Audiofly is fairly clear these are about ‘a perfect balance between bass, mids and highs’. The 96/24 version of Sæglópur, from Sigur Rós, has always shown up the shortcomings of any gear. The first section is a light breathy mix of noise, vocals and triangle that loses much of its nuance behind a piano in the foreground – high levels of control and a balanced sound are needed for this. The second part is a ‘wall of sound’ that benefits from strong clear bass and smears the sound stage and buries the vocals on lesser systems. The Audiofly’s presented, as my brother put it, ‘the best first part I’ve ever heard’. Every bit of soundscape was there and clearly presented behind the piano. My brother didn’t believe the second part was the best he’s heard in terms of bass, but it’s accuracy meant vocals came through clearly and the aural image was more emotional than expected. I personally felt it was the best I’ve heard given my preference for a more open and clean (rather than warm and bassy) sound. Another bonus for the streetwalkers among us is the very low levels of microphonics – that is, mechanical noise created when you bump or rub the cable. This might sound silly for those who haven’t experienced it, but it can be annoying when you’re walking down the street with the cable rubbing against your shirt. This doesn’t seem to be much of an issue for the Audiofly’s as mechanical noise is kept to a minimum. Conclusion I’ve really enjoyed borrowing these and they have me rethinking how much to spend on my next set of earbuds for daily use. Their fantastic sound quality and supreme comfort mean you’d be silly not to put them on the shortlist for your next purchase, regardless of price. Pros + Clean, neutral and balanced sound + Incredible imaging + Retains composure at all volumes + Easy to drive + Low levels of microphonics + Super comfortable + Universal MMCX connector Cons - No mic or in-line controls out of the box - Some may prefer a more V-shaped sound Specs · Driver type: Four balanced armature drivers with 3-way crossover · Driver arrangement: Dual bass, single mid, single high · Frequency range: 15Hz-25kHz · Crossover: Passive 3-way electronic crossover with Butterworth filter · Acoustic tuning: Physical 3-way frequency divider · Impedance: 16Ω · Sensitivity: 104dB at 1kHz · Cable length: 1.2m / 47” · Plug type: 3.5mm gold plated, right angle format Playlist
  10. Completely understandable. Happy to cover packing and shipping cost within reason (not even sure how much that would be lol)
  11. Damn...I'll take these if you're willing to ship to Melbourne? Been waiting for a pair of these to pop up!
  12. My god...Halcros are awesome, but that background setup 😍
  13. I actually went off and had a look after you posted this as I'm thinking about making a similar move into digital in the next year...not sure there is something similar that comes with a CD ripper. Could look at the Marantz ND8006 (don't think it can rip CD's, but it can play them) or the Cambridge CXN V2 (no ripping capability though), but that Innuos has such great reviews and is so feature rich I'd also go there instead! There are a few similar items, but they cost more...a fair bit more lol. Might be worth starting with reviews on The Master Switch and Darko Audio (half way down the page). The Digital Sources, DACs & Music Streaming sub-forum might also have some suggestions.
  14. I don't have up-firing speakers, but this Youtube vid might help with your question... https://youtu.be/7GMjnazQ81E
  15. That's the best part I think. I've always been kinda intimidated by MAC, if only because I feel my knowledge and musical taste differ by too far a margin. Hope this gets up...I'd be excited to participate!
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