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Wiffle

Best sound blocking material between floors?

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Wiffle   

HI All,

Shortly I'll be converting my downstairs garage into a dedicated music/listening room; the space is approx 3.7m(w) x 5.7m(l) x 3.6m (h).

Of primary concern is insulating the ceiling space to prevent as much sound as possible from getting into the house upstairs. The "ceiling" in the garage is the exposed floor joists with pine floorboards nailed directly onto them; they are approx 180mm deep, so I could use insulation up to that thickness. I don't need to line the ceiling of the garage if it's not required, but I don't want exposed glass-wool batts above me, so either I'll need another material or else lining the ceiling will have to happen.

Does anyone have experience with the best material for the job? Remembering that this is primarily to isolate the house from sound in the "music room", rather than treating the room acoustics (which will also happen once the insulation is in place).

Any help greatly appreciated!!!

Cheers,

Steve :-)

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What you need to do is fill the void with Bradford soundscreen batts.

Then line the ceiling with two layers of Gyprock SoundChek stuck together with Green Glue or Quiet Glue.

 

If you want to go the whole hog, you then put in a false ceiling attached to the walls only, isolating it from the floor/ceiling above with another two layers of Soundchek and noise glues.

 

Don't forget to post pics!

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Oh, if you do go the whole hog, you have plenty of headroom so that you could make a slanted ceiling so that it's not parallel to the floor.

That's one of the easiest and best room treatments for starters.

Edited by LogicprObe

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Wiffle   
 
Oh, if you do go the whole hog, you have plenty of headroom so that you could make a slated ceiling so that it's not parallel to the floor.
That's one of the easiest and best room treatments for starters.

Hmmm, could I go slanted even without the false ceiling?

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Weka   

You need the listening room ceiling to be physically unconnected to the floor above as a minimum otherwise you've got no hope of achieving an effective degree of acoustic isolation.

 

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Wiffle   
You need the listening room ceiling to be physically unconnected to the floor above as a minimum otherwise you've got no hope of achieving an effective degree of acoustic isolation.
 

Ok, so you're saying that even with 6" of acoustic insulation behind a sheet of acoustic gyprock it's still not going to work? If so, could I line the underside of the joists with some sort of rubber/foam abd then attach the gyprock through that?

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Weka   

The best connection is no connection :thumb:

The next best option is to utilize acoustic isolation brackets/devices to hang your ceiling from. Any form of hard fixing of the ceiling to the joists will transmit sound to the floor above.

 

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Hi Steve

Completed a similar thing a year ago, with the exposed joists and floor boards cieling as starters. Ended up using suspended timber pinebatten-work, went the whole hog with perf. soundcheck plaster, bulkheads and multi layer insulation of various grades, works really well to knock down 20 +dB between floors  had a real go at target actual response within the room.

 

The only thing I regret not doing was bonding plaster board directly to the underside of the floorboards ensuring a seal at the walls, as I feel this would have contributed well to knocking down the last few thumps and bangs heard from downstairs

Can be a really big job :) to do a great job and worth the extra yard

 

http://www.stereo.net.au/forums/topic/75988-a-battery-based-audiophile-story/?page=25

 

Edited by 125dBmonster

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Wiffle   
The best connection is no connection :thumb:
The next best option is to utilize acoustic isolation brackets/devices to hang your ceiling from. Any form of hard fixing of the ceiling to the joists will transmit sound to the floor above.
 

Thanks Weka. So if I put no connection into the too hard basket, what sort of isolation brackets would you suggest? I had thought of lining the joists with thick rubber weather seals or something of that nature to provide a decoupling medium, and then attaching through that into the joists; possible?

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Weka   
1 minute ago, Wiffle said:


Thanks Weka. So if I put no connection into the too hard basket, what sort of isolation brackets would you suggest? I had thought of lining the joists with thick rubber weather seals or something of that nature to provide a decoupling medium, and then attaching through that into the joists; possible?
 

 

Your decoupling medium is doing nothing if you hard-fix through it to the joists.

You need to go and research online commercial acoustic isolation methods and products.

 

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Isolation is key. The mass and damping will help, but not nearly as much. You want these things - http://www.gyprock.com.au/Pages/Products/Tools-Tapes-Accessories/Resilient-Mount.aspx

Gyprock-Resilient-Mount-Clip.png

 

Read here - http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing101/

Need to consider HVAC, doors, windows, electrical sockets. Any measures are only as good as the weakest link

Worth is? hell yes, unless you've been in a room designed and build in the above fashion its hard to describe.

And just line the room, any other acoustic elements (angled walls etc) should be done inside the soundproof structure (FWIW, I wouldn't do that, but thats a whole other issue)

 

 

Edited by Peter the Greek

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3 hours ago, Wiffle said:


Ok, so you're saying that even with 6" of acoustic insulation behind a sheet of acoustic gyprock it's still not going to work? If so, could I line the underside of the joists with some sort of rubber/foam abd then attach the gyprock through that?

Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
 

 

As Weka said..............you have to think of the floor above as a wobble board..............anything you attach to it will wobble.

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Just now, Peter the Greek said:

You also want this stuff for the floor above http://www.acoustica.com.au/angelstep-gold8-acousticunderlay/

 

?format=500w

And best practice is this between the floors ......two layers of drywall between the joists with 2 layers of greenglue.

 

 

 

131208Drywallonlift_zps09be3242.JPG

That's the bit I didn't do and wish I did

Saying that though it's the bedroom end of the home above so not critical that it's dead quiet above 

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Wiffle   

Ok, so I might start with the gyprock between the joists, then look at some batts and then the rondo mounts to a lined ceiling. Guess it is a big job!!!!

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1 hour ago, 125dBmonster said:

That's the bit I didn't do and wish I did

Saying that though it's the bedroom end of the home above so not critical that it's dead quiet above 

 

I jumped up and down on the floor above, the Mrs couldn't head it in the completed room. Worked great

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44 minutes ago, Wiffle said:

Guess it is a big job!!!!
 

 

It is.....I'd contract it out, took me forever to get done DIY.....well in saying that, my mate and I did his room in 4 days (clips and two layers)

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Wiffle   
 
It is.....I'd contract it out, took me forever to get done DIY.....well in saying that, my mate and I did his room in 4 days (clips and two layers)

Maybe a good idea; especially given that I'd need to hire scaffolding or a scissor lift due to the height of the ceiling.
Any recommendations for a contractor in the Sydney/Wollongong area? I'm thinking a specialist might be the way to go rather than just a general builder/plasterer?

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Just now, Peter the Greek said:

 

I jumped up and down on the floor above, the Mrs couldn't head it in the completed room. Worked great

Can still see the inch thick tas oak floor boards rippling with some of my heathen bass tracks I play, but that's Ok :P it's only when the Family are out and the Team have dropped in

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5 hours ago, 125dBmonster said:

@Wiffle

Pity either Peter the Greek or I don't live close by

Would be a good job, many hands 

 

Bah! thanks for volunteering me! ;):D .......I'm in the middle (well say 70% there DIY 3 bedroom home build.....) weekends only....its ****! I'm stuffed.....  :) 

 

Regarding contractors, find someone experienced in their use. I'd guess a commercial firm. But I'd ask the supplier and then ask the contractor some very pointed questions

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On 2017-7-8 at 1:49 PM, Wiffle said:

HI All,

Shortly I'll be converting my downstairs garage into a dedicated music/listening room; the space is approx 3.7m(w) x 5.7m(l) x 3.6m (h).

Of primary concern is insulating the ceiling space to prevent as much sound as possible from getting into the house upstairs. The "ceiling" in the garage is the exposed floor joists with pine floorboards nailed directly onto them; they are approx 180mm deep, so I could use insulation up to that thickness. I don't need to line the ceiling of the garage if it's not required, but I don't want exposed glass-wool batts above me, so either I'll need another material or else lining the ceiling will have to happen.

Does anyone have experience with the best material for the job? Remembering that this is primarily to isolate the house from sound in the "music room", rather than treating the room acoustics (which will also happen once the insulation is in place).

Any help greatly appreciated!!!

Cheers,

Steve :-)

 

By 'shortly'........how long before you start?

I can look up some of my charts for costings, spans etc but probably not for a week or so.

 

Are the walls all brick/block?

Why are you against an isolated ceiling?

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Wiffle   
 

By 'shortly'........how long before you start?

I can look up some of my charts for costings, spans etc but probably not for a week or so.

 

Are the walls all brick/block?

Why are you against an isolated ceiling?

Hey mate,

Not starting this week!!! So yeah, if you have any info you can add that'd be awesome.

Yes the walls are all brick; LH wall has pillars, others are fairly smooth.

I'm not at all against an isolated ceiling, just trying to get best bang-for-buck and not sure which way to go; happy for any help!!!

 

Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk

 

 

 

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Wiffle   

Has anyone come across this Barrierboard before? http://www.soundblock.com.au/sound-proofing-products/walls

Seems like a greenglue plasterboard on steroids, and given the cost of greenglue and being able to just stick up a single layer to the ceiling might be another good option? Of course I'd still use greenglue to stick it to the floorboards, but that's 1 layer of glue instead of 2...

 

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1 hour ago, Wiffle said:

Has anyone come across this Barrierboard before? http://www.soundblock.com.au/sound-proofing-products/walls

Seems like a greenglue plasterboard on steroids, and given the cost of greenglue and being able to just stick up a single layer to the ceiling might be another good option? Of course I'd still use greenglue to stick it to the floorboards, but that's 1 layer of glue instead of 2...

 

 

Last time I checked (a while ago) it wasn't as effective - costs more and hard to install/cut. Greenglue is easy to use and install is simple

 

 

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