TerryO

How many albums can you store on a 1TB Hard drive?

30 posts in this topic

hmm.. upsampling, is one thing i haven't heard of much.. 

i can wrap my mind around upsampling an image or video as this is merely softening the edges curves by filling in appropriate pixels.. so computer has a map of what to do and possibilities of estimating what needs to be done.. 

as for music.. i can't really imagine it how a non existent signal can be predicted and generated by a program or device, as there is no rule of which note and frequency should change to what direction.. maybe to an extend  to ease the decoding for the resource.. 

is there any good material or study about this ?

 

 

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Upsampling is not about creating information that wasn't there in the first place, but it helps overcoming certain technical difficulties.

As you may know, the signal coming out of DAC requires low pass filtering to prevent the decoding artifacts impacting the signal.

Now, assuming you want flat rfequency response up to 20 kHz, your ideal filter for redbook should go from zero to minus infinity between 20 and 22kHz - that's quite steep.

The same signal upsampled to 96 kHz will allow to use filter that fully mutes the signal over 48 kHz only - something that's much easier to implement and resulting in less signal hysteria happening around 20 kHz.

 

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4 minutes ago, PleasantSounds said:

Upsampling is not about creating information that wasn't there in the first place, but it helps overcoming certain technical difficulties.

As you may know, the signal coming out of DAC requires low pass filtering to prevent the decoding artifacts impacting the signal.

Now, assuming you want flat rfequency response up to 20 kHz, your ideal filter for redbook should go from zero to minus infinity between 20 and 22kHz - that's quite steep.

The same signal upsampled to 96 kHz will allow to use filter that fully mutes the signal over 48 kHz only - something that's much easier to implement and resulting in less signal hysteria happening around 20 kHz.

 

 

 

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On 18/06/2017 at 3:17 PM, TerryO said:

I have been considering backing up our CD collection on to a external hard drive and wondered how many hours of uncompressed music would a 1 TB hard drive store when I came across a website with this info on it.

 

Coming back to the original post:

Main items are:  Uncompressed CDs into 1Tb of Hard Drive.

 

The maximum a CD holds is nominally 700Mb. or about 1h 15m of music.  (1Tb / 700Mb = ) 1428 Cds x 1.25 hours = 1785 hours (approx)

This assumes using the same file format and data only (no images, metadata etc).

 

Backups are essential, as is good metadata programs and streaming programs. Also check if the drives are USB 3 and the capability of the drive enclosures.

 

 

Hope this helps

RalphH

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Thanks for that info Ralph, yes the hard drives are USB 3 versions, I'll check exactly what models and their specifications.

If a one TB hard drive can store over 1400 uncompressed CD's then that is fine by me. I only have at present about 600 anyway and while I'm still collecting them, mainly at present I am buying records, so chances are I'll never get to 1400 cd's.

 

cheers Terry

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