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   I’ve noticed that Melbourne IMAX are reinstalling the 1570 GT film projector for Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” along side the two 4K laser projectors. You will now have the choice of viewing the 4K version or the1570 Film version. Generally 1570 is capable of 8K+, but you will only see 4K resolution; If it was shot at 4K!.

Apparently some scenes were shot with IMAX cameras. But I don’t know if the cameras were IMAX digital or IMAX 1565 film cameras. I’m assuming the later, similar to “The Dark Knight or “Transformers”.

I think the only advantage here with 1570 projection is scene’s shot with IMAX cameras will go IMAX full screen 1.43:1 and the other scenes, standard scope, like “DK”.

I will be interesting to see if the digital version is the same or 2.39:1 all the way.

I say 2.39:1 but sometimes a little bit is shaved off the sides to get a slightly taller image. Not necessary as Melb IMAX is about the second biggest screen in the world after IMAX Sydney.

I for one will be checking out the projection room when I go. (You can only ask) I think this will be the last time 1570 is run. (It’s a pity it's not 3D film; Now that would be an impressive projection set up to behold).

 

 

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Darren69   

Good Morning,

 

as a fan of Christopher Nolan movies, I looked forward to seeing this one.

 

Be prepared for a lot of time-jumping, with the storyline going back and forth. Now I can usually keep up with this sort of thing but even I found it quite challenging, so those who like to go and sit, brain-out and be entertained, I fear you will be completely lost in half an hour.

 

Also, sorry to be Captain Obvious but it is a war movie and that's that, based on historical events. No love stories etc here, lots of injuries and death from all sorts of angles (accidental and from attack) and that little voice in the back of your head wondering how did we ever get to these things, as it does in war movies.

 

Cinematography was excellent.

 

For me, the air battles from the pilots points-of-view were the highlight, Tom Hardy once again his brilliant self.

 

The soundtrack is loud but so is war so I didn't mind that, artillery, old school engines, bombs etc all very loud.

 

One notable section was the soldier firing his 303 at the strafing planes (a famous Dunkirk image).

 

Worth a view and the cinema is a must, it will lose a good 30% of the impact through the telly, I know it certainly got the daddy long legs out of the local cinemas excellent main-cinema subs.

 

I give it 3 and a half stars, Margaret?

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Hergest   

Most movies that I really enjoy at the cinema I later buy on DVD when they go cheap and watch them time and again at home. Dunkirk ranks as one of the best films I've ever seen and certainly one that moved me the most but I can't see myself ever buying it and trying to recreate the sheer impact of the widescreen cinematic version as I know I will be so disappointed. 

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cafe67   
1 hour ago, Hergest said:

Most movies that I really enjoy at the cinema I later buy on DVD when they go cheap and watch them time and again at home. Dunkirk ranks as one of the best films I've ever seen and certainly one that moved me the most but I can't see myself ever buying it and trying to recreate the sheer impact of the widescreen cinematic version as I know I will be so disappointed. 

 

Looking forward to seeing this one , and yes I usually do the same except I forget to watch them :)

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soundfan   

I enjoyed it, but it's not what I consider a great movie. The soundtrack and visuals were outstanding though.

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Agree with @soundfan, was entertaining (as entertaining as this kind of me could be), but wouldn't say it was brilliant.

 

Certainly better than most of the nonsense released nowadays however.

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Hergest   

I wonder if the nationality of the viewer makes a difference? I'm a 54 year old English bloke born in 1962 so Dunkirk is part of our psyche whether we like it or not so so much of the film resonated because it all seemed so real as if you were being able to actually relive the occasion. The lack of dialogue, the absence of any contrived scripted romance etc just made me become part of the whole event as i sat watching it and the shock of walking out of the cinema down at Circular Quay to a blindingly sunny Sydney harbour was profound.

 

I'm not going to give away anything specific for those that haven't seen it as I reckon those moments that take your breath away are not to be hinted at but for the vast majority of the film I was on the edge of my seat even though i knew what was going to happen.

 

If someone made a film with the same impact of say the battle of Long Tan I wonder if the reaction of Australians would be different to those of other upbringings? 

 

It could just be me of course but both my  English wife and older English sister (she saw it on Imax in the UK) felt the same as me regarding Dunkirk.

 

 

 

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Darren69   

Sorry for the tangent but I reckon the mood one is in when watching a movie is hugely important to whether one enjoys or not. I have not enjoyed a movie in the past and then re-watched later and for some reason enjoyed so it must be a mood thing, I guess.

 

My mood-and-type-of-movie-planets need to align.

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scumbag   
13 hours ago, Hergest said:

I wonder if the nationality of the viewer makes a difference? I'm a 54 year old English bloke born in 1962 so Dunkirk is part of our psyche whether we like it or not so so much of the film resonated because it all seemed so real as if you were being able to actually relive the occasion. The lack of dialogue, the absence of any contrived scripted romance etc just made me become part of the whole event as i sat watching it and the shock of walking out of the cinema down at Circular Quay to a blindingly sunny Sydney harbour was profound.

 

I'm not going to give away anything specific for those that haven't seen it as I reckon those moments that take your breath away are not to be hinted at but for the vast majority of the film I was on the edge of my seat even though i knew what was going to happen.

 

If someone made a film with the same impact of say the battle of Long Tan I wonder if the reaction of Australians would be different to those of other upbringings? 

 

It could just be me of course but both my  English wife and older English sister (she saw it on Imax in the UK) felt the same as me regarding Dunkirk.

 

 

 

I agree. Those images of the Spitfire gliding over the beach with Zimmer's adaptation of Elgars' piece was amazing. Having gone to school in Scotland and having the story of Dunkirk taught at great length, this was a very powerful movie for me. Then on top of that you have a good screen play, amazing music and the best damn use of LFE (the sound of a Stuka dive bombing) that I have ever heard, period.

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gemini07   

 

'If someone made a film with the same impact of say the battle of Long Tan I wonder if the reaction of Australians would be different to those of other upbringings? '

 

Yes, I agree. The views of those people with Vietnamese heritage living here would certainly be different to those people with WASP 'Ozzie' backgrounds.

 

I'm seeing Dunkirk on Saturday night and am looking forward to it. Son says he rated it highly, which means I have to go.  

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Hergest   
3 minutes ago, gemini07 said:

The views of those people with Vietnamese heritage living here would certainly be different to those people with WASP 'Ozzie' backgrounds.

 

 

Could be a fascinating thesis for someone.

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Wimbo   
22 minutes ago, scumbag said:

Having gone to school in Scotland and having the story of Dunkirk taught at great length, this was a very powerful movie for me.

Same here back in the 60's. Back then we also built a lot of Airfix kits related to the Second World War. I built everything from the Tirpitz to B17G's to Hotspur class Destroyers.

Ohh and add to that all the comics like Eagle, Boys World and the miniature comics of WW2 fiction, we were enveloped with it.

Edited by Wimbo

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Darren69   

@scumbag the subs were making the floorboards rattle in the big old cinema I went to, especially when the bomber were flying past.

 

The sound of the big tailgunner opening up fire at Tom Hardy was also very scary, bloody great bullets coming straight at your head!

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Peter_F   

Dunkirk is an excellent movie.  The action sequences combined with the sound track were stunning and has significant impact in the cinema.  I saw it in KL last week in a cinema with Dolby Atmos and it seemed as real as it could be without being there.   

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cafe67   

Saw it today - standard cinema I think 

 

interesting movie as has been discussed, no love stories , but also amore understated movie than SPR or Hacksaw Ridge. 

 

3 stories of survival entwined in 1. 

 

Another movie  where Tom hardy has any dialogue, yet people are raving about his performance? 

 

Soundtrack seemed good, but I don't think it was one of HZ better efforts? 

 

But  to me a great movie and well worth seeing at the big screen 

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cafe67   

"If someone made a film with the same impact of say the battle of Long Tan I wonder if the reaction of Australians would be different to those of other upbringings? "

 

Sadly in in these days of political correctness and perhaps our own sense of history or. Interest in such recent history - can we make movies about war other than Gallipoli. I doubt it would get made.  

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Last week I visited the Melbourne IMAX projection room. The 1570 version (being a mix of 15/65 and 5/65 original) is mostly full frame IMAX with some 2.2:1 stuff. The 15/70 stuff looks great. The 5/70 not so great. The 8K laser DCP is similar. As for your local multiplex, DVD, BLU RAY or HD4K it will be letterboxed with I suspect some pan and scan in there. Bummer. (By the way I'm not sure if this post should go in TV, Radio & Movies, what do you think?, maybe wrong Forum)

20170720_204012.jpg

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I enjoy what Christopher Nolan does as a film maker,and this movie was no different for me. The cinematography was superb,and the tension created by the musical score like wise. It also shows you don't need a love story or 50 million pages of dialogue to get your point across. A smart film well made,a must on the big screen for war/history buffs.

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