AussieMick

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About AussieMick

  • Rank
    50+ Post Club

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  • Location
    Bendigo
  • Country
    Australia
  • First Name
    Michael.

Display Name History

  1. I quite like my wife, though. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. Ha! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. Agreed! I've only heard one system in my life that hit close. It was a jazz trio recording and the speakers were MASSIVE. Everything was mega bucks. It was stonkingly good. How much size, power and cost wound be needed to reproduce an orchestra?!?! I love my hifi for the very particular experience it brings. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  4. Leave it working for a few hundred hours, then judge it. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. It's a really interesting point. To some extent I feel like the live performance has a completely different goal than the recording. Live music is just as much about the occasion, the expectation, venue, the vibe in the audience. All of these things contribute to a particular "energy" surrounding the live event. The music itself becomes perhaps on 70% of the total experience. When we're at home listening, it's just not the same goal, is it? The studio sessions take longer, there's no live audience (which translates to a different vibe for the performers) and it almost certainly isn't a single take. So, I'm quite happy to listen while keeping in mind the recording engineer is as much a part of the process as the players. It's artificial in many ways, so I need to accept that in order to get past it. Of course, live recordings might be different, but can also be the result of blending multiple nights of recordings, or even studio based patch ups. It's no wonder that a few very rare recordings capture the live frisson and become famous for it. Listening to hifi isn't the same as live. Not better or worse, just different? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. Phase response, yes, also balance and frequency response. As for noise floor, it's not just about the signal to noise ratio of digital playback. All electronic components generate digital noise, and mains power can be the carrier of plenty of nasties, too. It's all injected into our systems, raising the noise floor. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  7. Agreed. The detail in recordings that gives soundstage clues is often low level, so reducing noise in the system and increasing resolution lead to better staging. Getting control of bass reproduction is also a big help. Clear, deep, unobtrusive bass helps out the high frequencies enormously. The soundstage itself is just referring to how well separated the individual instruments and voices are from each other. The easy one to get is side to side spread (left-centre-right). However, hearing front to back layering requires much more detail and subtly. Height seems to be the toughest to get right. So, top notch sound staging will give you just as much depth and height as it will width, provided it's on the recording. It becomes more "visual". Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  8. Agreed. The detail in recordings that gives soundstage clues is often low level, so reducing noise in the system and increasing resolution lead to better staging. Getting control of bass reproduction is also a big help. Clear, deep, unobtrusive bass helps out the high frequencies enormously. The soundstage itself is just referring to how well separated the individual instruments and voices are from each other. The easy one to get is side to side spread (left-centre-right). However, hearing front to back layering requires much more detail and subtly. Height seems to be the toughest to get right. So, top notch sound staging will give you just as much depth and height as it will width, provided it's on the recording. It becomes more "visual". Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  10. It's an EOI post, yes price is negotiable. I'm selling out of necessity, not choice. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  11. It's an EOI post, yes price is negotiable. I'm selling out of necessity, not choice. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  12. It's an EOI post, yes price is negotiable. I'm selling out of necessity, not choice. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  13. The Majestic is also a fully functioning preamp, so costs more. I think looking at a DAC would bring excellent immediate improvement. My two cents about your 'table is that it's also in a much higher class than your CD player, so maybe you'd need to get somewhere near that price/quality bracket? I use the m2Tech USB for headphone listening and it's wonderful for $320 Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  14. I should add that the TL5 and Graham Slee Majestic DAC I use are well matched in quality to my Rega RP8/Ortofon 2M Black. Your system seems really heavily weighted towards vinyl. On paper it looks like it would embarrass the Marantz. Mick. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  15. Hi Anthony, Have you considered using your current player as a transport and upgrading your DAC? There are tremendous examples at every price point, and you won't need to spend money on the mechanical elements. I bought myself a CEC TL5 transport and I'm delighted. Any future upgrades will be to the external DAC and I'll keep using the transport. The added bonus here is that I also have LOTS of hi-res downloads that I can play through the external DAC. Gold. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk